Antietam

(redirected from Battle of Antietam)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Antietam

indecisive battle of the Civil War (1862). [Am. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 15]
See: Battle
References in periodicals archive ?
A model of exhaustive and seminal scholarship, "Opposing the Second Corps at Antietam" is unreservedly recommended for community and academic library American Civil War History collections in general, and the Battle of Antietam supplemental studies reading lists in particular.
Slotkin argues that in the Summer of 1862 both sides were becoming convinced that a limited war would not achieve victory, compromise, or reunion and that the Battle of Antietam and the Emancipation Proclamation which followed marked the conscious strategic change to a kind of war that would end only by the outright victory of one side over the other.
Every year, on the anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, White would present Holmes with a red rose to wear on his judge's robe.
This narrative account, written by an award-winning novelist, uses techniques from fiction to offer a new interpretation of the factors and events leading up to the battle of Antietam in the summer of 1862.
The American Civil War tore the country apart and included the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, known as America's "bloodiest day".
The Emancipation Celebration is a remembrance days to when the Civil War raged, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation after the Battle of Antietam in August of 1862.
The Battle of Antietam, alternatively called Sharpsburg, fought on September 16-18, 1862, was one of the bloodiest engagements in America up to that date.
In the battle of Antietam, which was a 12 hour engagement and the bloodiest one day battle in the entire Civil War, the ambulance system was able to remove all the wounded from the field in 24 hours.
Lee's invading army immediately following the Battle of Antietam in 1862.
19 (ANI): An 1862 letter sent to President Abraham Lincoln from three military surgeons requesting for a chaplain to tend to the wounded and dying soldiers after the Battle of Antietam, accompanied by the president's signed response, has been returned to the National Archives here.
In this case, we recount portions of the Battle of Antietam and attempt to show how these lessons apply to current-day acquisition.
I noticed an error regarding the image of Allan Pinkerton and President Lincoln ["The War That Made Us Who We Are"] taken in 1862, two weeks after the battle of Antietam.