Plains of Abraham

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Plains of Abraham:

see Abraham, Plains ofAbraham, Plains of,
fairly level field adjoining the upper part of the city of Quebec, Canada. There, in 1759, the English under Gen. James Wolfe defeated the French under Gen. Louis Montcalm.
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Abraham, Plains of,

fairly level field adjoining the upper part of the city of Quebec, Canada. There, in 1759, the English under Gen. James Wolfe defeated the French under Gen. Louis Montcalm. The battle decided the last of the French and Indian WarsFrench and Indian Wars,
1689–1763, the name given by American historians to the North American colonial wars between Great Britain and France in the late 17th and the 18th cent.
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 and led to British supremacy in Canada. Part of the battle site is now built over, but a part is preserved as a national park.
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Plains of Abraham

English victory decided last of French and Indian wars (1759). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 7]
See: Battle
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Plains of Abraham

a field in E Canada between Quebec City and the St Lawrence River: site of an important British victory (1759) in the Seven Years' War, which cost the French their possession of Canada
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Backs to the Wall: The Battle of Sainte-Foy and the Conquest of Canada" Peter MacLeod (the pre-Confederation historian at the Canadian War Museum, where he curated the permanent exhibits on the Seven Years' War and The Battle of the Plains of Abraham) presents this historical event in riveting detail, from the preparation and day-by-day actions during the engagement to the compelling siege of Quebec by land and ship.
By contrast, the 1759 Battle of the Plains of Abraham is a case study of the benefits of a timely death.
Inevitably, therefore, Wolfe and Montcalm were immortalized and the Battle of the Plains of Abraham passed from the realm of history into the realm of myth, both for French-speaking Canadians and (soon enough) for English-speaking Canadians, as a tangible symbol of the Conquest (seen, naturally, from opposite points of view).
Lawrence River, and the name "Kebec" stems from an Algonquin Indian word meaning "where the river narrows." The British thought it was a good place as well, and France had to cede the colony after the battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759.
They followed the flag: one fought under Wolfe at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham; four generations served the Raj on the Indian sub-continent; another became a pioneer Australian; four more served in Africa where one died fighting white, and another black, opponents in South Africa, and a third worked as a missionary.
Benjamin West's depiction of the death of British General James Wolfe during the 1759 Battle of the Plains of Abraham is a famous, yet not completely accurate painting steeped in symbolism.
The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, which took only a morning to fight a short distance from Quebec City in September of 1759, was an improvised, even desperate affair with world-shaking consequences: It determined the fate of the North American continent, led to the American Revolution, allowed the global ascendancy of the British Empire and the decline of the French.
The Battle of the Plains of Abraham was the result of an almost incredible set of accidents, blunders, confusions and coincidences on both sides, and it killed both generals.
The 1,500 Scotsmen of the Regiment laid siege to Louisbourg in 1758, were at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham outside Quebec City in 1759, where they were the largest regiment, and in Montreal in 1760.
(He does not cite, however, Choiseul's memoirs or his published correspondence with either his predecessor Bernis or his friend Danish Foreign Minister Bernstorff.)(11) Even on purely American military topics, such as the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, Anderson's conclusions do not inspire confidence.
Soon after the arduous process of making The Far Shore, she made plans to adapt Margaret Laurence's book, The Diviners, and even considered directing a film about the Battle of the Plains of Abraham.