Baudelaire


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Baudelaire

Charles Pierre . 1821--67, French poet, noted for his macabre imagery; author of Les fleurs du mal (1857)
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I am fond of the poet Charles Baudelaire whose most famous work is The Flowers of Evil, a cycle of poems that discusses dreadful circumstances and finds beauty in them," Handler explained of his inspiration in a 2007 interview with (https://web.
In the first trailer released in October, Snicket gave a 'sneak peek' of the Baudelaire children's miserable yet interesting struggles.
Ao anexar o artigo a uma longa carta enviada a sua mae no dia 27 de marco de 1852, Baudelaire parece reduzi-lo a um texto de circunstancia quando afirma que ele trata de assuntos "especificamente parisienses" e que sua compreensao pode nao ser facil para quem esta "fora dos meios para os quais e sobre os quais" ele foi escrito (BAUDELAIRE, 1973: 191).
Claude Pichois y Jean Ziegler, Charles Baudelaire, Fayard, p.
In this brief but ambitious inquiry into the problem of novelty in the works of Baudelaire and Flaubert, Kathryn Oliver Mills seeks to correct a wide range of critical positions.
But rather than separate out a before and an after, Meltzer proposes that Baudelaire created an "aesthetic strabismus" that sees both "worlds" at once.
Connecting, comparing, and contrasting Whitman and Baudelaire is a frequent enough practice in Comparative Literature studies.
Baudelaire consistently flirts with the aestheticization of conflict.
While romantic poets like Victor Hugo represented the self as the center of a tumultuous and changing world, post-Romantic poets such as Charles Baudelaire redefined and destabilized the speaking "self" by making it complicit with the plebeian realities of the outside world.
Though it may seem a bit of a stretch to mention in the same breath a novelist known for her exploration of women's agency and the inimitable poet Charles Baudelaire, the fact of the matter is that Colette is also celebrated for her evocative poetic descriptions, especially when it comes to landscapes, plants, and animals (particularly cats, a source of inspiration for Baudelaire as well).
Poe and Baudelaire came at the tail-end of Romanticism, whereas Magritte, as a Surrealist, belonged to a movement that has sometimes been referred to as the prehensile tail of Romanticism, a Romanticism marked early on my lyricism, exuberance, and exoticism.