Bawdwin

Bawdwin

 

a city in Burma, in the Shan State. A rail terminus on a branch from the city of Mandalay, Bawdwin is the center of large deposits of polymetallic ores, evaluated (in 1956) at about 2.2 million tons. These ores contain approximately 49 grams/ton silver, 20.4 percent lead, 12.6 percent zinc, and 0.9 percent copper. The mine, together with the smelting plants and concentrating mills in Namtu, forms the country’s only combine of nonferrous metallurgy. Owing to the severe destruction in World War II and the slow reconstruction of industrial enterprises, the mine’s output in 1965 did not reach the prewar level. In 1965 the mine produced 16,900 tons of lead and 7,600 tons of zinc compared with the 92,800 tons of lead and 59,500 tons of zinc produced in 1937.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Myanmar Metals Ltd has announced that 34 million tonnes of low-grade material have been added to the initial resource estimate of the Bawdwin project in Myanmar.
Chairman John Lamb said: The revised resource estimate is further evidence of the significant unlocked value of the Bawdwin deposit.
The 649 square kilometre license area was applied for by the company based on immediate proximity to the historic Bawdwin silver-lead-zinc (+ copper, nickel, antimony and gold) mine.
These include the Bawdwin lead-zinc-silver mine, the Mawchi, Heinda, Hermyingyi and Kanbauk tin-tungsten mines and Kalewa coal mine.
Thus Martin never visited the Bawdwin silver-lead mines developed by Herbert Hoover's group, nor the extensive tin mines.
Like the Foreign Office at the time, however, she seems unaware that until 1918 Tilden Smith had been closely associated with Herbert Clark Hoover, and that the two men had created the greater part of their personal fortunes by reopening the old Chinese silver mine at Bawdwin in Burma and extracting its rich silver-lead-zinc ores.
It was advanced by the company to cover lands surrounding the historic Bawdwin zinc-lead-silver mine.
In view of their adequate mineral reserves, operations at a number of state-owned mines, such as Bawdwin (lead-zinc-silver), Mawchi (tin-tungsten), Heinda (tin), Hermyingyi (tin-tungsten) and Kalewa (coal) could be expanded but, before this can be done, the mines need to be modernised.