Bay of Pigs Invasion


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Bay of Pigs Invasion,

1961, an unsuccessful invasion of Cuba by Cuban exiles, supported by the U.S. government. On Apr. 17, 1961, an armed force of about 1,500 Cuban exiles landed in the Bahía de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs) on the south coast of Cuba. Trained since May, 1960, in Guatemala by members of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with the approval of the Eisenhower administration, and supplied with arms by the U.S. government, the rebels intended to foment an insurrection in Cuba and overthrow the Communist regime of Fidel Castro. The Cuban army easily defeated the rebels and by Apr. 20, most were either killed or captured. The invasion provoked anti-U.S. demonstrations in Latin America and Europe and further embittered U.S.-Cuban relations. Poorly planned and executed, the invasion subjected President Kennedy to severe criticism at home. Cuban exile leader José Miró Cardona, president of the U.S.-based National Revolutionary Council, blamed the failure on the CIA and the refusal of Kennedy to authorize air cover for the invasion force, but perhaps more crucial was the fact that the uprising the exiles hoped and needed to spark did not happened. Much later it was revealed that the CIA task force planning the invasion had predicted that the invasion's goals unachievable without U.S. military involvement; it is unclear whether Kennedy or CIA chief Allen Dulles knew of the assessment. In Dec., 1962, Castro released 1,113 captured rebels in exchange for $53 million in food and medicine raised by private donations in the United States.

Bibliography

See K. E. Meyer and T. Szulc, The Cuban Invasion (1962); H. B. Johnson, The Bay of Pigs (1964).

References in periodicals archive ?
While successful at first, I became widely associated with the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba.
Moreover, the lessons he is drawing from the Bay of Pigs invasion, which was one of the most embarrassing fiascos in US Cold War history, are completely distorted.
Addressing a gathering in Miami on the 58th anniversary of the failed 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, Bolton said that many Cubans in Venezuela are actually military and intelligence agents who control Venezuela's military and keep Maduro in power.
Bolton, a longtime Cuba hardliner, was frequently interrupted by applause in his address to an organization of veterans of the U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion on the 58th anniversary of the failed operation to overthrow Cuba's Communist government.
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The organization, which openly pursues global governance and has historically dominated the Cabinets of presidents from both parties, also had members in the media who played an important role in sabotaging the Bay of Pigs invasion.
Thursday's symbolic vote took place on the anniversary of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion when Fidel's forces defeated 1,400 US-backed rebels seeking to overthrow him.
Kennedy tried to overthrow Castro, but failed with the Bay of Pigs invasion. The theory claims that angry Cuban exiles killed Kennedy, blaming him for his failure.
The rhetoric was heated: "With God's help a free Cuba is what we will soon achieve," Trump said in a theater named for a leader of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion. But the new policy actually looks a lot like the old one.
The US backed the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba and its aftermath between 1961 and 1962, followed by the Cuban missile crisis in October 1962.
As for Castro, he said the 'revolutionary leader of the entire world' stood up to 'American imperialists,' and even led the fight in the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 against 1,400 'mercenaries' who were 'American lapdogs' sent by the United States of America to topple his communist government.