bayou

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bayou

(bī`ō, bī`o͞o) [Louisiana Fr.; from Choctaw bayuk=small stream], term used mainly in U.S. Gulf states, especially Louisiana and Mississippi, to describe a stationary or sluggishly moving body of water that was once part of a lake, river, or gulf and is swampy or marshy in nature. Bayou is sometimes used as a synonym for oxbow lake, a former meander in a river valley cut off from that stream.
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bayou

[′bī‚yü]
(hydrology)
A small, sluggish secondary stream or lake that exists often in an abandoned channel or a river delta.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
riddellii appear to be rare in Anacoco Bayou and absent from Toro Bayou.
This observation raises the question of why these species have persisted in portions of Toro Bayou and throughout Anacoco Bayou but not in the mainstem of the lower Sabine River.
Despite such impacts, the four species of concern have persisted in the upper portions of Anacoco Bayou and at one locality in Toro Bayou but are now absent or rare in the lower Sabine River.
The means of the two replicate sediment grabs taken from each site were used to estimate total organism density among bayous and total organism abundance per phylum among bayous.
Again, it is not possible to make a fair comparison between the three bayous due to the missing samples in Bayou Casotte, however, throughout the study, the mean Simpson Index for Bayou Heron was (1.79) followed by Bayou Cumbest (1.77) and Bayou Casotte had the lowest mean Simpson index for the entire study (1.28).
The bayou was once a main channel of the Mississippi River (its name means "fork" in French), but it was dammed off in 1904, after area residents complained of the great increase in annual flooding; the entire river to the north had been enclosed with levees to prevent upstream flooding and almost 2,300 miles of riverwater were coursing into the bayou.
Then two devastating hurricanes--Gustav and Ike--slammed directly into the bayou in the summer of 2008, doing even more damage to the area than the two "girls gone wild" (according to a T-shirt sold in New Orleans' French Quarter), Katrina and Rita, did in 2005.
HOT SPRING COUNTY (n = 1): Saline Bayou, 4.0 km S Friendship (Sec.
SAU (2); Bayou Meto WMA, Wrape Plantation, roadside pool (Sec.
Considerable data have been collected from Houston bayous over the past almost 20 years by the city of Houston, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (the state environmental agency), United States Geological Survey, and other agencies.
The monitoring data indicate that average FC levels in the bayous increase slightly as water flows downstream, suggesting that FC input comes from tributaries, point sources, and/or non-point sources along the bayous.
Again, poor trees on poor sites is the key to their survival; these ancient cypresses grow shoulder to shoulder along the boggy, unfarmable bayou channels, and most are twisted, shaky, overmature, and generally worthless for lumber.