beak

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beak

1. the projecting jaws of a bird, covered with a horny sheath; bill
2. any beaklike mouthpart in other animals, such as turtles
3. Architect the upper surface of a cornice, which slopes out to throw off water
4. Chem the part of a still or retort through which vapour passes to the condenser
5. Nautical another word for ram

beak

[bēk]
(botany)
Any pointed projection, as on some fruits, that resembles a bird bill.
(invertebrate zoology)
The tip of the umbo in bivalves.
(vertebrate zoology)
The bill of a bird or some other animal, such as the turtle.
A projecting jawbone element of certain fishes, such as the sawfish and pike.
References in classic literature ?
All are very good eating," said the Adjutant, clattering his beak.
I was young then," said the Adjutant, clattering his beak significantly.
No one is all happy from his beak to his tail," said the Adjutant sympathetically.
And though the robin did not answer, because his beak was occupied, Mary knew that when he flew away with his twig to his own corner of the garden the darkness of his dew-bright eye meant that he would not tell their secret for the world.
They have a habit of pursuing their fish-fry prey through the water at high speed while trying to catch them in their beaks.
All the while looking closely at them to make sure they're all right - that pieces of fishing line from people fishing in the pond haven't wrapped around any of their beaks, or that the dogs that often run unleashed in the park haven't taken a nip out of any of her flock.
You know it's mealtime for certain bottlenose dolphins off Australia's coast when they sport cone-shaped sea sponges on their beaks.
So why would researchers at the University of California at San Francisco swap the beaks of embryonic (unhatched) ducks and quails?
Specifically, use of these convenient seed dispensers may be leading to lengthier beaks in great tits.
One of our favorite activities was "Bird Beak Buffet," where we discovered why different birds have different shaped beaks.
Using fossils and a large comparative analysis of modern animals, Balanoff and a team of evolutionary biologists, led by Shuo Wang from the Capital Normal University in Beijing, found that the loss of teeth and the emergence of beaks are connected processes in theropods.
The use of a flexible cystoscope is a less invasive and more efficient method of retrieving detached resectoscope beaks.