optical axis

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optical axis

The imaginary line passing through the midpoint of a lens, mirror, or system of such elements and on which lies the focal point of parallel paraxial rays.

Optical Axis

 

The optical axis of a lens or a concave or convex mirror is the straight line that is the axis of symmetry of the refracting surfaces of the lens or of the reflecting surface of the mirror. It passes perpendicularly through the center of these surfaces. Optical surfaces that have such an axis are said to be axially symmetric. The optical axis of an optical system is the common axis of symmetry of all the lenses and mirrors in the system.

optical axis

[′äp·tə·kəl ′ak·səs]
(anatomy)
An imaginary straight line passing through the midpoint of the cornea (anterior pole) and the midpoint of the retina (posterior pole).
(optics)
A line passing through a radially symmetrical optical system such that rotation of the system about this line does not alter it in any detectable way.

optical axis

An imaginary line drawn from the geometric center of a film to the center of a lens. It may project beyond the lens. Also called a lens axis and a camera axis
References in periodicals archive ?
In the previous segmented ionization chamber, the collection plates and the high-voltage plates were repeated along the beam axis to divide the detector into regions.
53 nm) neutrons when the detector-downstream pinhole system was moved up-down respect to the beam axis.
The segmentation of the detector along the beam axis allows for a check on PC rotations, as the measurement of the rotation signal is a function of neutron energy: the PV rotation angle is independent of neutron energy [7], while PC rotations arising from residual fields scale as the inverse of neutron speed.
Several detector modules will be placed in series along the beam axis providing 100% collection efficiency.
hor] is a neutron horizontal velocity component, and L is the mirror length along the neutron beam axis.
0]x + [[dB]/[dz]]vtz where the x-axis is the axis of the spectrometer magnet and the z-axis is the beam axis, in two situations.