Beardmore Glacier


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Beardmore Glacier

 

in Antarctica, one of the largest valley glaciers on earth. Length, approximately 200 km; width, approximately 40 km. The glacier descends from the Polar Plateau and flows into the Ross Ice Shelf, in the southwestern part of the Shackleton coast. The annual ice flow at the glacier’s mouth is approximately 6 cu km. The glacier was discovered in December 1908 by the English expedition of E. Shackleton and named after Lord W. Beardmore, who had supplied financial aid in equipping the expedition.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the second season four remaining dogs accompanied the six expeditioners who made the brutal trek all the way to the Beardmore Glacier.
Ashworth excavated the relic from a 2-meter-thick outcrop of siltstone along Antarctica's Beardmore Glacier.
Keohane, Thomas Crean and Dr Edward glacier; ponies Snippetts, Nobby, Michael glacier PICTURES: Scott Polar Research Institute/PA * Above, a photograph taken by Captain Scott of Cherry Garrard, Henry Robertson Bowers, Patrick Wilson on Beardmore glacier.
However, because Scott so grossly misjudged the difficulties of manhauling (along with other equally damning misjudgments), he and his men were still out on Beardmore Glacier well into the onset of the Antarctic autumn and long after Amundsen and his party had successfully returned to their base at the Bay of Whales.
He was one of only five to make it to the South Pole on January 17, 1912, before dying at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier a month later.
Cherry-Garrard, Bowers, Keohane, Crean and Wilson struggling in soft snow on Beardmore Glacier, Antarctica - some of more than 100 photographs taken by > explorer Captain Scott while on the ill-fated Antarctic Expedition 1910-13 Robert Falcon Scott/Scott Polar Research Institute
Evans, the son of a Swansea "Cape Horner" - the name given to sailors who rounded the perilous tip of South America - died in his tent at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier.
Gower-born Evans, who struggled on despite severe injuries, died at the foot of the lonely Beardmore Glacier.
As the disappointed men made their way back through blizzards, minus 45C temperatures, virtually impassable terrain and occasional blinding sunshine, Petty Officer Evans, who suffered a heavy fall, finally lost his fight for life at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier.
The adventurer from the Gower died in his tent at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier on February 17.
Gower-born Evans died at the foot of the Beardmore Glacier exactly a month after he'd reached the Pole.