Beardmore Glacier


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Beardmore Glacier

 

in Antarctica, one of the largest valley glaciers on earth. Length, approximately 200 km; width, approximately 40 km. The glacier descends from the Polar Plateau and flows into the Ross Ice Shelf, in the southwestern part of the Shackleton coast. The annual ice flow at the glacier’s mouth is approximately 6 cu km. The glacier was discovered in December 1908 by the English expedition of E. Shackleton and named after Lord W. Beardmore, who had supplied financial aid in equipping the expedition.

References in periodicals archive ?
She thought of Captain Scott arriving at the Beardmore glacier and Roald Amundsen tackling the Axel Heinberg.
Although January 1912 was marked with slightly below-average temperatures and pressure, high temperatures and good conditions were observed in early February 1912, when Scott and his companions were at the top of the Beardmore Glacier.
searching for mountains reported by Amundsen to the east of the pole was initially stated to be an important objective but another proposed route lay to the west of 'the great Victoria chain of mountains' and eventually the most certain route was selected: to follow in Shackleton's own footsteps from the nimrod expedition and descend the Beardmore glacier onto the Ross Iceshelf.
He said of his creation: "I really like the Beardmore Glacier.
To get to the pole, they crossed the Ross Ice Shelf, traversed the Beardmore Glacier and skied across the Antarctic Plateau.
The teammates have covered 900 miles along the Ross Ice Shelf, traversed the Beardmore Glacier and crossed the Antarctic Plateau to the South Pole in 63 days, enduring temperatures of as low as minus 46 degrees Centigrade in 24-hour daylight.
They were able to survey the site briefly before returning to the Beardmore Glacier site," it said.
In 1908, Shackleton and three companions reached a new farthest south latitude, discovered the Beardmore Glacier and became the first people to travel on the South Polar Plateau.
It is a testament to the character of the British men that, having been beaten to the pole, on their return they still diverted to the Beardmore Glacier to gather scientific samples.
On 1 October 1915 the men stranded on Ross Island commenced sledging journeys to lay stores as far south as the Beardmore Glacier.
Ashworth excavated the relic from a 2-meter-thick outcrop of siltstone along Antarctica's Beardmore Glacier.