Beaux-Arts style

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Beaux-Arts style

(1860–1883)
Historical and eclectic design on a monumental scale, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, typified this style. It was one of the most influential schools in the nineteenth century, and its teaching system was based on lectures combined with practical work in studios and in architectural offices. Its conception of architecture lies in the composition of well-proportioned elements in a symmetrical and often monumental scheme.

Beaux-Arts style

A grandiose architectural style as taught at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris primarily in the 19th century, widely applied until 1930 to large public buildings such as courthouses, libraries, museums, railroads, and to some pretentious residences. Characteristics often include formalism in design, symmetrical plans, heavily rusticated arched masonry, ashlar stone bases with rusticated stonework, especially on the ground floor and raised basement levels; sculptured figures; a massive and symmetric façade, often with a projecting central pavilion; a monumental attic story; commonly decorated with dentils; enriched entablatures; monumental flights of stairs; classical columns often set in close pairs; banded columns, engaged columns, coupled pilasters; highly decorated pilastered parapets; balconies; sculptured spandrels; decorative brackets; sculptured figures; ornamental details such as cartouches, floral patterns, Greek key designs, ornamental keystones, medallions; elaborately decorated panels, and the like; the roof, commonly a flat or low-pitched, hipped, or a mansard roof; often, domes and rotundas; rectangular windows symmetrically placed, with lintels overhead; arched dormers, balustraded windows, pedimented windows, or windows with balconets; doors, commonly paneled with a glass-paneled canopy over the primary entry-way, flanked by columns or pilasters; a wrought-iron grille on the exterior side of the entry door. Also called Beaux-Arts Classicism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspired by the French beaux-arts architecture of the original 18th century St Regis New York, and John Jacob Astor's vision of the finest hotel in the world, St Regis Dubai will feature a grand staircase and select artworks.
Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor City is inspired by Beaux-Arts architecture from New York's Gilded Age and will offer a total of 233 world-class accommodation, comprised of 182 guest rooms and 51 signature suites.
It is widely known as one of New York's finest examples of Beaux-Arts architecture.
Like any landmark, it wasn't immediately embraced -- it was mocked for being "neither grand nor central" -- but in time, New Yorkers came to love its Beaux-Arts architecture and innovative layout, which used ramps (as opposed to the traditional staircases) to allow travelers to drag suitcases more freely around the concourse.
The beaux-arts architecture is superb, a testament to early twentieth century prosperity.
Moored at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, this Dutch sailing barge includes all the modern utilities and from the deck there are views across the Seine and the Beaux-Arts architecture of Passy on the opposite bank.
One of the guiding ideals of Beaux-Arts architecture, with its emphasis on symbolic expression, was that buildings ought to unify the arts of architecture, painting, and sculpture.
The mansion is a mix of Italian Renaissance and Beaux-Arts architecture and is full of special details like a finished exercise room and ballet studio in the attic and a basement with two wine cellars.