Beds


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to Beds: Bunk beds, twin beds, IKEA

Beds,

England: see BedfordshireBedfordshire
or Bedford,
former county, central England. Also called Beds, it was abolished as an administrative authority in 2009, but it remains a ceremonial county under the Lieutenancies Act. The county seat was Bedford; other chief towns were Luton and Dunstable.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in classic literature ?
Now it was plain that the lady must be a real Princess, since she had been able to feel the three little peas through the twenty mattresses and twenty feather beds.
He was in bed when I came in, and he made me come and sit down on his bedside, for he said he had something to say to me which was of some moment.
Beds, then, are of three kinds, and there are three artists who superintend them: God, the maker of the bed, and the painter?
This serious question troubled her all through the evening, and kept her awake when she went to bed.
Some of these formations, which are represented in England by thin beds, are thousands of feet in thickness on the Continent.
The car- penter, who had been a soldier in the Civil War, came into the writer's room and sat down to talk of building a platform for the purpose of raising the bed.
let it never Be foolishly said That my room it is gloomy And narrow my bed; For man never slept In a different bed -- And, to sleep, you must slumber In just such a bed.
She opened the door of a room on the floor below and took the child over to a bed in which a woman was lying.
The sort of living being which lay upon that plank on the morning of Quasimodo, in the year of the Lord, 1467, appeared to excite to a high degree, the curiosity of the numerous group which had congregated about the wooden bed.
There was an extra bed in it tonight, very near my own, but differently shaped, and scarcely less conspicuous was the new mantel-shelf ornament: a tumbler of milk, with a biscuit on top of it, and a chocolate riding on the biscuit.
To all this conversation Don Quixote was listening very attentively, and sitting up in bed as well as he could, and taking the hostess by the hand he said to her, "Believe me, fair lady, you may call yourself fortunate in having in this castle of yours sheltered my person, which is such that if I do not myself praise it, it is because of what is commonly said, that self-praise debaseth; but my squire will inform you who I am.
At any rate, I made up my mind that if it so turned out that we should sleep together, he must undress and get into bed before I did.