Praesepe

(redirected from Beehive Cluster)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Praesepe

(prēsē`pē) [Lat.,=manger], open star clusterstar cluster,
a group of stars near each other in space and resembling each other in certain characteristics that suggest a common origin for the group. Stars in the same cluster move at the same rate and in the same direction.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in the constellation Cancer; cataloged as M44 or NGC 2632. It was first recorded by Hipparchus (c.150 B.C.). The cluster is often called the Beehive because of its shape. It contains several hundred stars, many of which are doubles. It is faintly visible to the naked eye and an excellent object for a low-power telescope.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Praesepe

(pri-see -pee) (Beehive; M44; NGC 2632) A large open cluster in the constellation Cancer with over 200 known stars. It can almost be resolved by the naked eye but is best viewed with a very low-power telescope or with binoculars.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Praesepe

 

(Beehive), an open cluster in the constellation Cancer. (SeeSTAR CLUSTER.)

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Praesepe

[′prē·sə‚pē]
(astronomy)
A cluster of faint stars in the center of the constellation Cancer. Also known as Beehive; Manger.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The relatively young age of the Beehive cluster makes these planets among the youngest known," said Russel White, the principal investigator on the NASA Origins of Solar Systems grant that funded this study.
Watch as the Beehive Cluster and the lunar crescent sweep across the sky, some 4[degrees] apart.
The main standout object of the constellation is of course M44, Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster. This is a rich open cluster, which can just about be detected with the naked eye from a dark site.
16 EVENING: Look toward Cancer in the west after sunset to see the thin sliver of the waxing crescent Moon about 8[degrees] from dazzling Venus, with the Beehive Cluster (M44) almost exactly halfway between.
The planet's pass through Cancer does not place it nicely near to Messier 44, Praesepe, or the Beehive cluster as it is also known, being some 3[degrees] distant at its closest around February 8, but it could make an interesting photo opportunity for a wide field shot, and should be a nice binocular view.
As Mars enters Cancer that morning, a thick crescent Moon will hang between the planet and the Beehive Cluster, M44.
[19] EVENING: The Moon, in Cancer, hangs 6[degrees] below the Beehive Cluster (M44).
The head of the comet was very close to the smaller, much dimmer patch of M44 (the magnitude-3.1 and lV20-wide Beehive Cluster).
22 EVENING: The first-quarter Moon is in Cancer, some 2[degrees] to 3[degrees] below the fuzzy Beehive Cluster (M44); use binoculars to distinguish individual cluster members.