Beer's law

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Beer's law

Beer's law [for August Beer], physical law stating that the quantity of light absorbed by a substance dissolved in a nonabsorbing solvent is directly proportional to the concentration of the substance and the path length of the light through the solution; the law is sometimes also referred to as the Beer-Lambert law or the Bouguer-Beer law. Beer's law is commonly written in the form Acl, where A is the absorbance, c is the concentration in moles per liter, l is the path length in centimeters, and ε is a constant of proportionality known as the molar extinction coefficient. The law is accurate only for dilute solutions; deviations from the law occur in concentrated solutions because of interactions between molecules of the solute, the substance dissolved in the solvent.
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Beer's law

[′bā·ərz ‚lȯ]
(physical chemistry)
The law which states that the absorption of light by a solution changes exponentially with the concentration, all else remaining the same.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The absorbance components of the spectra in the wavelength which range from 250 to 300 nm are further analyzed based on the Beer-Lambert Law; the compositional information on nucleic acid and protein content can be obtained, which agrees with literature values reported for E.
In this section, the validation of the microchannel experimental results was done by comparing with UV spectrophotometer reading and also with theoretical calculation using Beer-Lambert Law of Absorption.
As can be seen from the proof procedure of the Beer-Lambert Law, transmittance is derived from the equation below:
The Beer-Lambert law is the mathematical principle used to describe light absorption and the properties of the material through which the light is traveling.