Beet Loader

Beet Loader

 

a machine that picks up beet tubers from piles and windrows, partially cleans dirt from them, and loads them into vehicles. There are stationary machines, driven by electric or internal-combustion engines, and mobile loaders, which operate on a power takeoff shaft from the tractor engine. Both continuous and noncontinuous mobile mounted loaders are used in the USSR. They are mounted on medium-power tractors equipped with reduction gears.

Continuous loaders have a rotary feed mechanism and rod-chain cleaning conveyors. Noncontinuous loaders have a rake-type feeder and an auger cleaner. The feeder picks up tubers from a pile and drops them onto a lengthwise conveyer. The tubers are then transferred to a cross conveyor, into a loading elevator, and finally into a vehicle bed. A tractor operator and one to two workers are needed for operation. The swath width is 2.1–3.3 m, productivity 50–60 tons/hr, the operating speed 0.25 km/hr, and the loading height 3 m.

References in periodicals archive ?
The museum has a Scott Urshal 1-row harvester, manufactured by the Ohio Sugar Beet Combine Co.; a John Deere 54A 1-row harvester and a locally manufactured Sishc beet loader, which picked up a windrow of beets and loaded them into a truck or wagon.
Is this beet loader hand-made or factory manufactured?
The ad at right showcases the many uses of power units (they're recommended for everything from combines to threshers, peanut shellers to sheep shearers, irrigation sprayers to beet loaders), and the ad at far right--though promoting the importance of soil conservation--makes a startling observation about the impact of then-modern technology.