Beethoven

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Beethoven

Ludwig van . 1770--1827, German composer, who greatly extended the form and scope of symphonic and chamber music, bridging the classical and romantic traditions. His works include nine symphonies, 32 piano sonatas, 16 string quartets, five piano concertos, a violin concerto, two masses, the opera Fidelio (1805), and choral music
References in periodicals archive ?
BEETHOVEN was the single composer most responsible for transforming the symphony from its eighteenth-century status as a brilliant entertainment into the most prestigious and masterful genre of instrumental music.
Beethovens Orchestermusik itself is arranged in twenty-two unnumbered chapters, fifteen of which deal with specific pieces, individually or in groups, and seven of which deal with topics that more generally relate to Beethoven's orchestral music as a whole.
The existing notation A#-F in both original editions is an absurdity: nowhere else did Beethoven ever write a diminished sixth camouflaging the sound of a perfect fifth -- quite to the contrary: whenever the danger arose that an unusual modulation might be misunderstood, he took pains to present his intentions in a clear way.
Plantinga offers a number of provocative ideas that will require some time for Beethoven scholars to assimilate.
Albrecht not only offers a plausible explanation to account for Beethoven's "alleged remark to Anton Schindler" about the meaning of the heretofore dismissed allusion to Shakespeare's The Tempest, he also presents a Beethoven far more literate than most biographers have so far credited him, an approach that might pave the way for future studies on Beethoven and literature.
Alexander Wheelock Thayer, Ludwig van Beethovens Leben, 3 vols.
In a "Zwischenbericht zur Gesamtausgabe Beethoven Werke," Ernst Herttrich (Bonner Beethoven-Studien 1 [1999]:133-40) recapitulates the much lamented history of an edition that, in the forty-some years since its inception in 1961 under the auspices of the Beethoven-Archiv in Bonn, has produced a mere thirty volumes, of which twelve still lack the critical reports that would justify any claim to authority in the first place.
Although Beethoven knew about Simrock's undertaking, there is no evidence that he tried to ensure that even the major mistakes, of which he was well aware, were corrected.
There are seventeen handwritten corrections, only five of which were also marked by Beethoven in his copy.
First, we need to remember that the first sonata in which Beethoven included the German noun Hammerklavier (pianoforte) in the title was no.
The inclusion of these particular recordings also allows listeners to consider the ever-changing sensibilities brought to bear on Beethoven interpretations and recordings over five decades.
Expert at the hand-stopping technique requisite of virtuoso players of the then-valveless horn, Punto inspired Beethoven to create an entertaining showpiece that remains to this day part of the basic repertory of every hornist.