Bagram

(redirected from Begram)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Bagram

an air base in NE Afghanistan, near Kabul; now under the control of US forces

Bagram

 

Begram; ruins of the ancient Kushan city of Kapisa in Afghanistan, 60 km north of Kabul. Excavations have been carried out since 1936 by French archaeologists, first J. Hacken, and later by R. Ghirshman. The city existed from the second century B. C.until the middle of the fourth century A. D., had a regular plan, and was surrounded by thick walls with towers. A main street, the palace, and dwellings have been excavated. The various artistic articles (ceramics, glass, bronze) that have been discovered include both local items and those imported from India, China, and Rome. Carved bone plates depicting dancing girls were found in the palace.

REFERENCES

Mandel’shtam, A. M. “O nekotorykh rezul’tatakh rabot Frantsuz-skoi arkheologicheskoi missii ν Afganistane.” In the collection Sovetskaia arkheologiia, vol. 21. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954.
Masson, V. M., and V. A. Romodin. Istoriia Afganistana, vol. 1. Moscow, 1964. Pages 170–76.
Ghirshman, R. Begram. Cairo, 1946.
References in periodicals archive ?
The consensus is that these Begram objects date to the first century C.
Otra pieza con una decoracion semejante a las botellas de Begram es la recuperada en Padua (Fig.
Por otro lado, si atendemos al sistema decorativo mas que al perfil del vaso, cabe senalar que los paralelos mas cercanos estan en las piezas recuperadas en Begram.
By 262 Begram and Taxila had been destroyed, and the northwestern areas of the former Kushan Empire incorporated into the Sasanian state of Kushanshar.
This exiled collection includes two of the Begram ivories and material from Ai Khanoum.
Since publication of my 2007 article, I have found two more--one of which was part of a collection formed in the nineteenth century and apparently discovered at Begram, Afghanistan, which may indicate the widespread use of seals with this theme across Sasanian territory and even beyond, (31) the other in an auction catalogue.
Mr Karzai also expressed interest in a series of ivory figures, part of the treasure trove discovered by French archaeologists in 1937 at Begram, an important historical site located north of Kabul.
The treasure of Begram was brought to light by the French archaeological mission in 1937, and mostly comprises carved ivory plaques and sculptures in the Kushan style of Mathura, glass vessels from the Roman Mediterranean world, and bronze sculpture and original plaster casts illustrating Classical themes, of which a good selection was sent to Paris.
Osmund Bopearachchi examines objects imported from the Hellenistic East to Begram in Afghanistan, including a previously unpublished statuette of Venus, and relates them to similar objects that were "Indianized" and produced locally.
The problem is most coherently addressed in Sanjyot Mehendale's "Begram and the Reexamination of 1-Isuan-tsang's Kapisa," which sets out to dispute the seventh-century Chinese traveler's identification of Begram as Kapisi, the capi tal of the Kushan emperors.
Chapter IV is very short, but takes the transmission of Andhra style even further geographically, to Afghanistan, in a discussion of the Begram ivories.