behaviouralism

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behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet what is conspicuously missing in historical research on this mid-century disciplinary remake--associated mostly even if somewhat inaccurately with the emergence of political behavioralism (1)--is an account of its rhetorical and discursive dimensions that, this essay sets out to argue, played by no means an insignificant role, either for its audience, or for the morale of the innovators themselves.
Kysar, Taking Behavioralism Seriously: The Problem of Market Manipulation, 74 N.
Behavioralism predicts that the status quo bias and people's tendency to engage in hyperbolic discounting will prevent many employees from enrolling in savings plans even when they would "really" prefer to save more.
Antonio Damasio, "A Legacy of Behavioralism in the Neurology of Emotion," interview with Siri Hustvedt for bigthink.
Thaler & Sendhil Mullainathan, Behavioral Economics, THE CONCISE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ECONOMICS, supra note 71 (summarizing the influence of behavioralism in economics).
Part II considers the assertions made by skeptics that the incomplete nature of behavioral theories makes the predictive use of such theories more difficult, and argues that continued disregard of behavioralism makes parsimonious theories less predictive as well.
lt;<His commitment to behavioralism, in these and other ways, overwhelmed the demand for a more interpretive approach at every turn.
These assumptions led to the emergence of the behavioralism school of thought and in different ways paved the way for the application of scientific methods in public policy (Chakrabarti 1976; Dahl, 1971).
73) One doesn't hear much of Leibenstein or X-inefficiency today, but economic behavioralism has re-emphasized recognition of the flexibility that exists within a large corporation, or indeed any firm that is not under the immediate threat of extinctive competition, to deviate from the maximally efficient posture.
Kysar, Taking Behavioralism Seriously: Some Evidence of Market Manipulation, 112 HARV.