behaviouralism

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behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
As a behavioralist, Hallowell locates the goal of pimadaziwin, and its harmonious state-of-being, within the self and as an individually driven motivation (1955:174).
have been provided."(102) Meaning-oriented behavioralist explanations of the causal link between ideas and policies, in other words, "must be accompanied by a causal story indicating the mechanisms through which observed correlations evolve."(103) In ideational analysis, these mechanisms stem significantly from institutions and from the ideas themselves.
Thus, Stevenson and Jarillo clearly side with the behavioralist view of entrepreneurship.
To this end, the behavioralist approach introduces new techniques - surveys, interviews, the compilation of aggregate data - that can identify correlations between various socio-economic and psychological factors and the foreign policy behavior of the state.
This realization might have moved the profession to see that neither the behavioralist nor the civic booster approach was adequate and that political scientists needed to study more closely the agencies and bureaucracies in which they worked during the thirties and forties.
(127.) Michael Hallsworth et al., The Behavioralist as Tax Collector: Using Natural Field Experiments to Enhance Tax Compliance, 148 J.
The behavioralist belief that horizontal merger guidelines reify a theory of rational choice unconnected to empirics is simply incorrect.
Model 2 rejects the behavioralist methodological assumptions of Model 1--that is, that Court action can be explained by assuming that factors either internal to the Court or external to the Court inform what the Court does.
These theories, called behavioralist and managerial, contain assumptions that their proponents argue are in greater accord with the real world behavior of actual firms.
Under a behavioralist regime, courts would need to hear expert testimony and make a complex, fact-sensitive determination about salience.
RICCI, THE TRAGEDY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 133-75 (1984) (discussing the behavioralist revolution in political science); RAYMOND SEIDELMAN & EDWARD J.