behaviouralism

(redirected from Behavioralist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have learned a great deal about friction in machines," stated a behavioralist research proposal, "but almost nothing about friction between human beings.
When Hume famously described reason as a "slave to" passion, he was making a descriptive statement about human nature that echoes modern behavioralists, (298) one central to his (and James Madison's) theory of government.
Second, the behavioralist stance refers to the role of elites and public opinion in influencing, stimulating or obstructing the democratization processes, and third, the study of attitudes in relation to democratization processes is a measuring tool for clarifying the public support and commitment to the cause.
First, a brief summary of the behavioralist movement and its weaknesses is presented.
2002) (rejecting the empirical behavioralist and empirical interpretive analyses).
essentially behavioralist in its orientation; his study seeks to draw
Whittington, Once More unto the Breach: Post Behavioralist Approaches to Judicial Politics, 25 LAW & Soc.
26) The theoretical progress in general is done in political science and sociology, and the participation of the scholars from these traditional disciplines in area studies, brought more and more theoretical formulations, Marxist, neo-Weberian, neo-statist, behavioralist, structural-functionalist, historical sociology, and cultural approaches, to the area studies.
SUPREME COURT (1999) and applying behavioralist theory to interpret judicial decisions).
Before the film reaches that gooey point, though, Resnais delights in commenting on the tiresome predictability of it all, employing the chuckle-inducing behavioralist metaphor of the lab rat -- complete with key scenes restaged with rodent-headed actors.
Two schools of thought surfaced as a result of the large number of dropouts: "industrial arts, with a goal toward social reform and an emphasis on the developmental psychology of the learner; and vocational education, with an aim toward social efficiency using behavioralist psychology" (McCrory, 1987, p.
BEHAVIORALIST CHALLENGE In a recent article on the implications of behavioral economics for antitrust, Amanda Reeves and Maurice Stucke assert that firms do not always enter markets when entry would be profitable.