behaviour

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behaviour

(US), behavior
Psychol
a. the aggregate of all the responses made by an organism in any situation
b. a specific response of a certain organism to a specific stimulus or group of stimuli

behaviour

  1. the alteration, movement or response of any entity, person or system acting within a particular context.
  2. (PSYCHOLOGY) the externally observable response of an animal or human organism to an environmental stimulus (see also BEHAVIOURISM).
An important distinction is often made in sociology between automatic forms of behaviour described in 2 (e.g. jumping up after sitting on a drawing pin) and intended ACTION, where social meanings and purposes are also involved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We suggest that fathers reinforce, reconfirm, or change their father identity by choosing from various alternative behaviors based on feedback from significant others" (p.
To view youth information-seeking behavior as generally lacking is to overlook the new behaviors nurtured and facilitated by the digital environment and to miss the golden nuggets embedded in these studies.
Key words: applied behavior analysis, psittacine birds, problem behavior, reproductive behavior, avian, hyacinth macaw, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus
Data were collected on problem behaviors and communication during the treatment evaluation.
Teacher use of descriptive analysis data to improve interventions to decrease students' problem behaviors. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 26, 227-238.
BALTIMORE -- A functional assessment of behavior problems in children with developmental disabilities helps clinicians form a hypothesis for why a problem behavior occurs and what reinforces it, so they can use the information to guide treatment, according to a behavioral scientist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore.
Client characteristics, type and cause of the client's behavior problem, situation, effective treatments, and relevant people involved varied across cases.
Add Health followed a cohort of youth who were in grades 7-12 at baseline, in 1995: the study of the relationships between depressive symptoms and risky sexual behavior used data collected then and in the subsequent wave.
Likewise, the model offers an explanation for how fish schools change their behaviors on the fly--for instance, if a predator suddenly appears.
But we can make kids less "victim prone" and less apt to be singled out for the bad bullying behavior that can make them feel terrible.
Although a strong communication culture may emerge from witnessing the behaviors of top management, research shows that offering rewards and incentives that acknowledge effective communication helps to strengthen and sustain that culture.
There is convincing evidence that parenting behaviors profoundly impact the development of positive behaviors and outcomes in youths and adolescents.