behaviour

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behaviour

(US), behavior
Psychol
a. the aggregate of all the responses made by an organism in any situation
b. a specific response of a certain organism to a specific stimulus or group of stimuli

behaviour

  1. the alteration, movement or response of any entity, person or system acting within a particular context.
  2. (PSYCHOLOGY) the externally observable response of an animal or human organism to an environmental stimulus (see also BEHAVIOURISM).
An important distinction is often made in sociology between automatic forms of behaviour described in 2 (e.g. jumping up after sitting on a drawing pin) and intended ACTION, where social meanings and purposes are also involved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Client characteristics, type and cause of the client's behavior problem, situation, effective treatments, and relevant people involved varied across cases.
In regression analyses controlling for background and risk-related characteristics, males with a high level of depressive symptoms at baseline were significantly more likely than those with a low level to say at follow-up that they had engaged in at least one of the specified risk behaviors between interviews (odds ratio, 1.
Likewise, the model offers an explanation for how fish schools change their behaviors on the fly--for instance, if a predator suddenly appears.
They may test out bullying behavior with lots of kids until they find the targets that are vulnerable because they know they can win the power game.
Eleven employee behaviors, including quality of work, time management, problem solving and communication, were rated, and a 12th item rated the employee's overall job performance.
Adolescent health behaviors include, but are not limited to, nutrition/dietary practices, physical activity, weight control, drug, alcohol, and tobacco use, injuries and violence, and sexual activity.
The change in student behaviors after experiencing PBL in a small group was sufficient to suggest that these new behaviors may have reflected the influence of the intervention.
For example, by altering the reward system in an organization, leaders can communicate what new behaviors are being encouraged.
They embody in practical terms the common denominators of how individuals actually go about successfully changing their behaviors.
The first reason is that learning courses typically focus heavily on the use of operant conditioning procedures for increasing the likelihood of desirable behaviors and decreasing the likelihood of undesirable behaviors.
Breaks in the confirmation process can also occur when the identity holder is so rigid in requiring reflected appraisal to match the identity standard that constant readjustments of behaviors interrupt other processes.
So, to focus solely on behaviors that need improvement is to forget these differences.