Belarusian language


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Belarusian language

or

White Russian:

see Russian languageRussian language,
also called Great Russian, member of the East Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Slavic languages). The principal language of administration in the Soviet Union, Russian is spoken by about 170 million people as a
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; Slavic languagesSlavic languages,
also called Slavonic languages, a subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. Because the Slavic group of languages seems to be closer to the Baltic group than to any other, some scholars combine the two in a Balto-Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
yalenskaga mg, methods of belarusian language and literature 300 copies.
On display is a selection of artifacts including ancient jewellery, garments, photographs, religious and private documents and a 13th century paper cardboard textile manuscript from western Belarus called Kitab which has texts of Belarusian language written in a calligrap-hic Arabic script.
Special attention was paid to the proposal to set up a centre for Arabic language and culture at the Belarusian State University and a centre for Belarusian language and culture at an educational institution in Oman.
The sources said on basis of MoU and a protocol of mutual cooperation between the Ministries of Education of two countries, an agreement for establishment of Urdu and Belarusian language chairs (on reciprocal basis) was signed during visit of President of Belarus to Pakistan on October 6, 2016.
Yet the European Union's only media presence in Belarus is through the Polish-funded Belarusian language television channel Belsat.
There is Francysk Skaryna gymnasium with Belarusian language instruction in Vilnius.
Public opinion polls show the reported use of Belarusian language (by 3 percent of respondents) to be almost twenty times lower than the use of Russian (57 percent), while 24 percent use a mixture of two languages and 16 percent use both.
Mort's poetry focuses on keeping the Belarusian language alive, despite many governmental attempts to absorb it into Russian.
The Belarusian language is now taught at schools and, as a recent gas dispute with Russia showed, the government chafes when Moscow tries to boss it around.
This book is the slightly updated edition of Shirin Akiner's hitherto unpublished dissertation of 1980 on a manuscript in the Belarusian language but in Arabic script.
This theory emerged in the context of deficit of Belarusian language in public space of contemporary Belarus and could be interpreted as a kind of reterritorialization in order to support national feelings (13).
These often untitled and unpunctuated free-verse poems are bracketed by two poems that address the resurfacing of the Belarusian language. Suppressed in the Soviet era in favor of Russian, Belarusian continues to be marginalized by the political elites.
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