belay

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belay

Mountaineering the attachment (of a climber) to a mountain by tying the rope off round a rock spike, piton, nut, etc., to safeguard the party in the event of a fall
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
That term is used when the climber wants the belayer to take their weight on the rope and lower him or her down to the ground slowly.
The second and third passes over the footage showed less concentration on the part of the belayer when they perceived they were not being filmed.
The duration of the recovery phase was chosen to last 2 minutes so as to imitate a possible situation during training sessions, where climbers usually alternate with their belayers to ascend the routes and therefore rest while the other person is climbing.
A drowsy lifeguard, belayer, van driver, trip leader, or boat driver could neglect duties or experience slowed reaction time...with lethal consequences.
One end of the rope is attached to the harness of the climber while the other end is locked in the harness worn by the belayer. The belayer is the person on the ground who secures the climber, keeping a close eye on the climber's progress and letting out slack to the line by releasing the belay, a special device that locks the rope a little at a time as the climber slowly ascends.
even before looking 40 feet down to where my belayer (an experienced guide/climbing partner), Mike Demchack stood, securing my rope from below.
But she says, "You just need to trust your belayer." So consider morphing into a wall-rat.
Rock climbing commands and status reports passed between the two easily - "Ready to climb," "On belay," "Climbing," "Climb on." Communication between the belayer and the climber is extremely important.
In doing this, the belayer is minimizing the distance the climber will fall should they lose their grip.
One end of the rope is secured to the climber and the other to a belayer at the bottom.
The climber wears a harness with a rope extending from the harness, up the route of assent and back down again to where his climbing partner acts as the belayer. As the climber ascends, the belayer takes in the slack.