Bell's theorem


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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of our activities are written up by David Kaiser (2011) in How the Hippies Saved Physics about our explanation of quantum nonlocality, quantum entanglement and Bell's Theorem.
And he revealed he was interested in quantum mechanics after becoming inspired by Belfast scientist John Bell's Theorem.
She said that in the recent Vienna Conference, attended by leading physicists and marking the 50th anniversary of Bell's Theorem, there was no mention at all of ESP nor of Eastern mysticism.
Among her topics are a disproof of Bell's theorem by Clifford algebra valued local variables, failure of the theorem and the local causality of the entangled photons, what sets the upper bound on quantum correlations, restoring local causality and objective reality to the entangled photons, and refutation of some arguments against the disproof.
The article makes it plain that researchers now need to consider the implication of Bell's theorem of non-locality, which indicates that quantum "particles," such as the electrons and atoms in molecules, do not even need to be close to each other, provided they have been previously quantum entangled.
Their book offers yet another popular account of the 'quantum enigma', in all its various guises: covering Bell's Theorem, the EPR 'paradox', the nature of superpositions, the two-slit experiment and so on, all nicely leavened with the usual 'history-lite' and some cute pseudo-Galilean dialogues to help explain what's going on.
It is generally accepted that Bell's theorem [1] is quite exact to describe the linear hidden-variable interpretation of quantum measurement, and hence "quantum reality".
On the theoretical side, we have, as an outgrowth of Bell's theorem, the constantly improving classification of entangled states, and the development of measures of entropy and information content of such states; GHZ states, Shor's algorithm, various sorting techniques, and error-correcting codes.
Cushing suggests that had de Broglie been able to answer Pauli's objections, and had Bell's theorem been discovered in the 1920s, then perhaps the pilot wave would have won over the physics community.
Deep interconnectedness" demonstrated by Bell's Theorem embraces the interconnectedness of everything unbounded by space and time.
2) As Bell's Theorem became well known, its author was often asked to survey the state of the subject, particularly in the light of his own contribution.
According to Dossey, nonlocality is supported by physics, specifically John Stewart Bell's theorem.