Bell's theorem


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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stevens Institute of Technology and the University of Vienna scientists were co-authors on Bell's Theorem for Temporal Order, published in Nature Communications.
I had met John Clauser in 1972 and had seen his experimental test set up of the Bell's theorem, nonlocality experiment on the UC Berkeley campus.
And he revealed he was interested in quantum mechanics after becoming inspired by Belfast scientist John Bell's Theorem.
Disproof of Bell's Theorem: Illuminating the Illusion of Entanglement, 2nd Edition
She said that in the recent Vienna Conference, attended by leading physicists and marking the 50th anniversary of Bell's Theorem, there was no mention at all of ESP nor of Eastern mysticism.
Disproof of Bell's theorem; illuminating the illusion of entanglement.
The article makes it plain that researchers now need to consider the implication of Bell's theorem of non-locality, which indicates that quantum "particles," such as the electrons and atoms in molecules, do not even need to be close to each other, provided they have been previously quantum entangled.
Their book offers yet another popular account of the 'quantum enigma', in all its various guises: covering Bell's Theorem, the EPR 'paradox', the nature of superpositions, the two-slit experiment and so on, all nicely leavened with the usual 'history-lite' and some cute pseudo-Galilean dialogues to help explain what's going on.
It is generally accepted that Bell's theorem [1] is quite exact to describe the linear hidden-variable interpretation of quantum measurement, and hence "quantum reality".
On the theoretical side, we have, as an outgrowth of Bell's theorem, the constantly improving classification of entangled states, and the development of measures of entropy and information content of such states; GHZ states, Shor's algorithm, various sorting techniques, and error-correcting codes.
6 My colleague Shelly Goldstein half-seriously suggests that those physicists and philosophers who believe that Bell's theorem demonstrates the impossibility of hidden-variable theories like Bohm's mistakenly think that there are two John Bells, one responsible for the theorem and the other advocating Bohm's theory.
Thirty years later John Bell derived a theorem (Bell's Theorem) proving the existence of local hidden variables is inconsistent with statistical predictions of quantum mechanics (Capra, 1982).