Bell's theorem

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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Title: Testing Bell's Inequality with Cosmic Photons
Abstract: A practical scheme to use photons from causally disconnected cosmic sources to set the detectors in an experimental test of Bell's inequality will be discussed.
Organization is in 20 chapters beginning with a brief survey of analytical dynamics and ending with chapters on quantum theory of free electromagnetic field, interaction of radiation with matter, and Bell's inequality.
Violation of Bell's inequality under strict Einstein locality conditions.
There are reasonable discussions of some aspects of physics, such as his introduction to Bell's inequality and the EPR paradox, but most are cursory and some even suggest misconceptions.
Topics include the unification of classical and quantum probability theories, EPR-Bohm and the original EPR experiments, Bell's inequality, interpretations of its violation and loopholes, simulation of EPR-Bohm co-relations in the local realistic approach, nonlocality, contextual probabilistic models, subjective probability and quantum information, quantum logic, and results of recent experiments in quantum information, model theory, discrete time, dynamics, and the philosophic foundations of probability.
Aspect A: Bell's inequality test: more ideal than ever.
Rowe MA, Kielpinski D, Meyer V, et al: Experimental violation of a Bell's inequality with efficient detection.
In this short paper, as an extension and consequence of Einstein-Podolski-Rosen paradox and Bell's inequality, one promotes the hypothesis (it has been called the Smarandache Hypothesis [1, 2, 3]) that: There is no speed barrier in the Universe and one can construct arbitrary speeds, and also one asks if it is possible to have an infinite speed (instantaneous transmission)?