Bell System


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Bell System

Before AT&T was broken up in 1984 by court order, the Bell System referred to AT&T and all the Bell Telephone companies that were part of it, but had separate names to provide a regional flavor. The Bell name, of course, came from Alexander Graham Bell. See AT&T, Divestiture and RBOC.


Now, Artifacts in Antique Stores
As AT&T grew to be the largest corporation in the U.S., the Bell name became synonymous with telecommunications. New England Telephone & Telegraph was one of AT&T's 23 operating companies before Divestiture.


Now, Artifacts in Antique Stores
As AT&T grew to be the largest corporation in the U.S., the Bell name became synonymous with telecommunications. New England Telephone & Telegraph was one of AT&T's 23 operating companies before Divestiture.
References in periodicals archive ?
By performing vital work on the Distant Early Warning missile detection system and Nike missile systems and by managing Sandia Laboratories, the Bell system could continue arguing for a privileged legal position as a national strategic asset.
That is, he says the bell system is "almost like a carwash.
During the initial phase, the Bell System recruited female employees after boy clerks proved unruly.
This was important because just about every activity and service in the Bell System was measured according to various performance standards.
1) This should particularly be true when the monopolist's position is shielded from entry by public policy, as was the case for the modern Bell System during much of its history.
AcroVista's BellCommander School Bell System is used by hundreds of schools, factories, stores, and businesses for scheduled audio, paging, and emergency notification applications.
When it became clear that the Bell System would lose, negotiations between the government and AT&T to settle the case began in earnest.
So we had a splash of boiling water thrown on us in 1984 when the courts broke up the old Bell System.
Assessing the impact on telecommunications in the ten years since the decision to break up the Bell System, the essays in this volume address several questions of interest to historians of business, public policy, and technology.
It has, then and now, catered to only a small segment of the buying public; those business people who, for one reason or another, could not abide the Bell System.
Divestiture of the Bell System in 1984 dramatically reversed more than a century of integration, standardization, and centralization.