Bell Labs

(redirected from Bell Telephone Laboratories)
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Bell Labs

Bell Labs

The research and development center of Alcatel-Lucent, formerly Lucent Technologies and AT&T. One of the most renowned scientific laboratories in the world, many of the major electronic inventions of the modern age were developed at Bell Labs, including the transistor, the laser, solar cell, wavelength optical multiplexing (see DWDM), the Unix operating system and the C programming language.

In 2015, Nokia acquired Alcatel-Lucent and Bell Labs officially became Nokia Bell Labs. See transistor and laser.


The Real Bell
Alexander Graham Bell was born in Scotland in 1847 and died in 1922. His famous sentence "Mr. Watson - come here - I want to see you!" were the first words to travel over a wire, ringing in the birth of electronic communications. (Image courtesy of AT&T.)
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1949, GMP and Bell Telephone Laboratories joined forces to pioneer the first modern automatic lashing machine, the Model B Lasher, establishing the telephone industry's standard in lashing technology.
The Bell Telephone Laboratories was "unstructured, entrepreneurial, and kept application forever in mind," Baker once remarked.
For example, in 1951 Bell Telephone Laboratories invited Hollywood film director Frank Capra to produce four television films on scientific subjects.
Lansky, a radio engineer for Bell Telephone Laboratories.
Prior to Verizon, Sylvester held positions at Bell Atlantic, AT&T and Bell Telephone Laboratories.
While at Bell Telephone Laboratories, he developed the semiconductor amplifier, or transistor, with two coworkers.
Then, in 1958, a group of scientists at Bell Telephone Laboratories found that growing a thin layer of silicon dioxide on the surface fulfilled the bonds.
The other key equation, room-temperature laser, was developed just three months later by Bell Telephone Laboratories.
The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Clinton Joseph Davisson of Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York City and Sir George Paget Thomson of Great Britain, for their independent "discovery of the interference phenomenon in crystals irradiated by electrons.
Kaufmann was with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California in the Chemistry and Materials Science Department as a Division Leader of Materials, and he was also with the Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey as a member of the Radiation Physics Research Department.
Shannon, then at Bell Telephone Laboratories, who proposed the basic search and evaluation strategies that still underlie the way computers generate chess moves.
In some ways, Lucent's research enterprises echo those of the original Bell Telephone Laboratories.