Bell's theorem

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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
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(6), it is possible to derive the so-called Bell inequalities (Bell 1964, Brunner et al.
Both, this and more general Bell inequalities can be derived in a systematic way by means of a geometric approach (Brunner et al.
He covers the principle of the common cause: its shapes and content, formal properties of screening off and explanation, the principle of the common cause and the Bell inequalities, the principle of the common cause and the causal Markov condition, causal closedness, and causal completability.
Gisin, "Violation of bell inequalities by photons more than 10 km apart," Physical Review Letters, vol.
One separability criterion is based on the violation of Bell inequalities (Werner, 1989), where separable states are required to satisfy all Bell inequalities (Werner, 1989).
Specific topics include error filtration, quantum strong flipping, photon pair generation, entanglement and eavesdropping, single qubit quantum multiparty communication, the relativistic no-cloning theorem, a coarse-grained Schrodinger "cat," a quantum di Finetti theorem for the unitary group, better Bell inequalities, security of quantum key distribution protocols based on ququarts, linear-optics manipulations of photon-loss codes, biased reconstruction and homodyne tomography, state ordering v.
By explicit constructions of local models it shows how to separate entangled systems, treating the "bad" cases that violate the Bell inequalities. It follows from these constructions that locality, even in these bad cases, does not entail holism.
The main conclusion is that although relativity is compatible with tenses, relativity plus the notorious Bell inequalities make the existence of tenses unlikely.
The non-local property of binary lattice space for wavefunction provides the violation of Bell inequalities [9] in quantum mechanics in terms of faster than-light influence and indefinite property before measurement.
The lack of due consideration for separable hidden variable theories has, in Howard's view, considerably affected the way of looking at the derivation of the Bell inequalities. He argues that locality is not the only prerequisite for the derivation of Bell inequalities (Howard [1985]).
Boole's conditions (4), (5), (6) have a special name in the physics literature: they are called Bell inequalities.(13)
By contrast, Bell inequalities show that local realism contradicts QM statistical predictions other than the perfect anticorrelations.