Bellay


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Bellay

Joachim du . 1522--60, French poet, a member of the Pléiade
References in periodicals archive ?
The history of Du Bellay criticism shows that programmatic statements like this have generally been taken at face value, at least since the nineteenth century when Du Bellay's verse was rediscovered by Sainte-Beuve and his contemporaries.
La impronta de Du Bellay se verifica tambien en la silva <<Roma antigua y moderna>>.
Here, Du Bellay announces his esthetic of spontaneity and impremeditation.
inspiracao de que se investe o argumento de Du Bellay.
Without du Bellay and Herder, apparently, literary history would have been completely different.
Reading Petrarchan lyrics by writers such as Joachin Du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Philip Sidney, and Mary Wroth alongside Petrarch's originals and in the context of the Renaissance commentaries surrounding them, Kennedy vividly illustrates the close imbrication of early modern Petrarchism with emergent discourses of nation and shows how rival narratives of ethnic and national origin ground themselves in the political Petrarch bestowed upon later periods by these Italian commentaries.
Joachim Du Bellay, who "confesses" his imitation of Petrarch in the first preface to his Olive published in 1549, addresses its opening poem to the garland of olive branches from which the collection takes its title in the hope that he may make it "Egal un jour au Laurier immortel" ("Equal one day to the immortal Laurel"; Kennedy, "Ronsard's Petrarchan Textuality" 91-92; DellaNeva, "Du Bellay" 402-03).
Though the rhyming of the original French is lost, we experience the lyricism of the verse that recalls, sometimes slyly, the grand French tradition of Villon, Du Bellay, Ronsard, and Apollinaire.
Particularly welcome, therefore, is Anne Lake Prescott's fine study of Spenser's reading habits, concentrating upon his lifelong engagement with the writings of Du Bellay.
For Du Bellay's original (with Spenser's translation on the facing page) see Joachim du Bellay, Antiquitez de Rome translated by Edmund Spenser as Ruines of Rome, ed.
For here are some eloquent settings of some of the most distinguished French lyric verse, by Ronsard and Du Bellay, presented in a fine scholarly edition.