Bellingshausen Sea


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Bellingshausen Sea,

part of the S Pacific Ocean, W Antarctica, SW of Cape Horn between the Antarctic Peninsula and Amundsen Sea. The sea is named after Russian explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, who circumnavigated Antarctica in 1819. Major islands in the sea include Alexander I, Peter I (both named by Bellingshausen), and Charcot islands.

Bellingshausen Sea

 

the border sea of the Southern Ocean on the shores of Antarctica, between the Antarctic and Thurston peninsulas. Depth, from 410 to 4,470 m in the open sea. The shore is mountainous and bordered with shelf glaciers. The sea’s large islands are Peter I Island and Alexander I Land. The water temperature in the north is about 0° C; in the south, lower than - 1° C. In summer the salinity is approximately 33.5 parts per thousand. The currents move clockwise. The larger part of the sea’s surface is covered with floating sea ice and icebergs year-round; in the winter and spring months the entire surface of the sea is covered with ice. The sea was discovered by the Russian expedition of F. F. Bellingshausen and M. P. Lazarev in 1821.

Bellingshausen Sea

an area of the S Pacific Ocean off the coast of Antarctica
References in periodicals archive ?
IceBridge expanded its reach this year, covering a vast swath of Antarctica from the Ruppert Coast in West Antarctica to Recovery Glacier in the eastern half of the continent, plus the Weddell and Bellingshausen seas. Additionally, IceBridge flew twice over the South Pole, an area rarely measured since satellites dont overfly it.
During mid-June, a stationary wave-three atmospheric pattern began to develop (Section 6b), with broad low-pressure centers to the north of the Bellingshausen Sea (~80[degrees]W), East Antarctica (~140[degrees]E), and Dronning Maud Land (~40[degrees]E) that broadly correspond to the SIE anomalies (Fig.
Through May and into early June, SIE continued to be above average across much of East Antarctica but below average in the western Ross, Amundsen, and Bellingshausen Seas and across the eastern Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean sectors (~10[degrees]W-80[degrees]E).
5; this flight originated in Punta Arenas, flew to the Bellingshausen Sea marginal ice zone, and then profiled northward along 90[degrees]W.
6.3f), with anomalies over the Antarctic Peninsula, Bellingshausen Sea, and eastern Amundsen Sea more than 2.5 standard deviations below the climatological average.
A positive anomaly then appeared in the Bellingshausen Sea and strengthened in later months of 2015 (Figs.
The ASL is the climatological area of low pressure located in the South Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean (SO), which comprises the Ross Sea, the Amundsen Sea, and the Bellingshausen Sea, over the latitude band 60[degrees]-70[degrees]S.
The large negative anomaly center in 2013 over the Drake Passage and the Bellingshausen Sea (between 45[degrees] and 120[degrees]W) is weaker and shifted to the Amundsen and Ross Seas in 2014.
However, the magnitudes of anomalies are increased but the extents were smaller compared to 2012, especially the negative anomalies over the Bellingshausen Sea (between 60[degrees] and 110[degrees]W).
The cooling trends, in contrast, are small and spatially limited, confined to the North Atlantic near Greenland and the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas off the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.
In West Antarctica, ice shelves are being eaten away by warm ocean water, and those in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas have thinned by as much as 18 percent since the early 1990s.
Satellite observations show that several ice shelves on the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas thinned between 2003 and 2008.