benedictine

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Related to Benedictine Nuns: Dominican nuns, Carmelite nuns

benedictine

(bĕnədĭk`tēn), sweet liqueurliqueur
, strong alcoholic beverage made of almost neutral spirits, flavored with herb mixtures, fruits, or other materials, and usually sweetened. The name derives from the Latin word to melt.
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 originated in 1510 by Benedictine monks at Fécamp, France, and now manufactured by a secular concern on the grounds of the old abbey. Every bottle bears the initials of the Latin dedication Deo Optimo Maximo [to God most good, most great]. The exact formula of benedictine remains a secret.

Benedictine

1. a monk or nun who is a member of a Christian religious community founded by or following the rule of Saint Benedict (?480--?547 ad), the Italian monk
2. a greenish-yellow liqueur made from a secret formula developed at the Benedictine monastery at Fécamp in France in about 1510
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Laurence Lux-Sterritt, English Benedictine Nuns in Exile in the Seventeenth Century: Living Spirituality (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017); Jenna Lay, Beyond the Cloister: Catholic Englishwomen and Early Modern Literary Culture (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016); Jaime Goodrich, 'Nuns and Community-Centered Writing: The Benedictine Rule and the Brussels Statutes', Huntington Library Quarterly, 77 (2014), 287-303; Victoria van Hyning, ' Expressing Selfhood in the Convent: Anonymous Chronicling and Subsumed Autobiography', British Catholic History, 32 (2014), 219--34; The English Convents in Exile, 1600--1800: Communities, Culture and Identity, ed.
The benedictine Nuns came to Kylemore in 1920 after their abbey in Ypres, Belgium was destroyed in World War I.
This was the case at the magnificent Douai library, where I was overwhelmed to discover the existence of 70 boxes (recently acquired after the closure of St Scholastica's abbey at Teignmouth), containing material related the Benedictine nuns. Not all of this material was relevant to my research, but it all required careful examination nonetheless.
It 's also home to A the nry Castle, which played a key role in the Anglo-Norman control of Connaught in the 13th and 14th Centuries, plus Kyle more Abbey, founded by Benedictine Nuns in 1920.
In the first two essays of the section on "Female Religious," Susan Broomhall examines how the chronicle of the Benedictine nuns of Beaumont-les-Tours, in Tours, France, comes to minimize the ethnic difference of Antoinette de Saint-Estienne, the Canadian-born daughter of a Frenchman and a Mi'kmaq woman, who was educated in the abbey after being sent to France as a child and professed as a nun there in 1646; and Joan C.
We drove out of Connemara into County Mayo to visit Kylemore Abbey, home to Benedictine nuns - and the place where pop queen Madonna is to send her daughter Lourdes for a convent education.
Thus the Benedictine nuns at Winchester received more than a translation of the original Latin text.
The Benedictine Nuns at Our Lady of the Rock Monastery on Shaw Rock near Washington are using the Internet to attract new recruits.
According to this understanding of obedience, Benedictine nuns can only be faithful to the Church when they are schismatic or nearly so.
A number of years ago, when I was able, I used to attend vespers with a community of Benedictine nuns. I loved the quiet simplicity of the worship, the nuns anonymous in their habits, the liturgy so natural and unforced.
His formal dealings with the main contractor were sometimes conducted with the help of the Benedictine nuns at the Abbey of Notre-Dame-de-Wisques, and sometimes with the aid of their chaplain, Dom Assemaine, with whom he shared lodgings and who took on the task of translating the Specification 'with the best will in the world' using such Dutch as he had picked up from his studies of Flemish mystics.
It is pleasant to imagine the young Julian being educated by the Benedictine nuns at Carrow and later borrowing books from the Augustinian house across the road from her anchorhold.