Byrhtnoth

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Byrhtnoth

(bĭrkht`nōth) or

Bryhtnoth

(brīkht`nōth), d. 991, alderman of the East Saxons. Leader of the English forces in the battle of MaldonMaldon
, town (1991 pop. 14,754) and district, Essex, E England, on the Blackwater estuary. Maldon is a market town with iron foundries and other small industries. The Maldon area has long been known for its sea salt; salt has been harvested there for more than 2000 years.
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, he was killed in the battle and was buried at Ely.
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References in periodicals archive ?
She omits The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son, which is perhaps logical, given the aims of her essay, but it is regrettable, since the one-act play is not elsewhere discussed as a story, but rather only for its connections to Tolkien's academic work and even in that context only very briefly.
Tolkien, Risden discusses Tolkien as scholar, narrator, stylist; heart of darkness, heart of light: externalizing the internalized quest; the world of the text and the expanding waste land; Tolkien on heroism: Beorhtnoth, Aragorn, and Arthur; epic, fairie, and myth: the mortal and the monstrous body; Tolkien and myth: orientalism and occidentalism; good and evil, choice and control; and teaching Tolkien and his world and why he matters.
Tolkien's "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son," a sequel to the poem to which editors have given the title "The Battle of Maldon," for example, is written entirely in what Tolkien, in his brief introduction to the poem or "recitation," called "a free form of the alliterative line," and a speech Tolkien assigned to Treebeard in The Two Towers provides an excellent example of Tolkien's alliterative style.
Beckman said for the non-Shakespeare piece he chose to perform "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth," a short play written by J.
Tree and Leaf; Smith of Wootton Major; The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth.
Tolkien's "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth, Beorhthelm's Son," (1) commmentary on The Battle of Maldon has focused on one word, sometimes almost to the exclusion of the rest of the poem.
The way in which this plays out in the conversation between Bilbo and Smaug has its roots in the Old English Exeter Book Riddles, but our understanding of it can also be informed by Tolkien's latter essay on The Battle of Maldon, "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son.
Tolkien, "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth, Beorhthelm's Son," Essays and Studies 6 (1953): 1-18.
Tolkien takes a much more pessimistic view of the dragon fight in Beowulf in his essay on "Ofermod" appended to his alliterative verse radio play The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth (1953).
These are The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son, "Leaf by Niggle," "The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun," "Imram," the poems of The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Smith of Wootton Major, and "Bilbo's Last Song.
In this sense Tolkien's idea of the dyscatastrophic finds expression beyond "The Monsters and the Critics," in the 1953 dialogue poem "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son," his commentary on the Anglo-Saxon fragment The Battle of Maldon, and the apparatus, foreword and afterword, with which it was published.
However, though Tolkien celebrates the ancient heroic model by recalling figures such as Beowulf and Beorhtnoth in valiant characters like Aragorn, he also uses The Lord of the Rings to show that these heroic ideals no longer have a place in modern society and in warfare after World War I.