Berdychiv

(redirected from Berditchev)

Berdychiv

(byĭrdē`chĭf), Rus. Berdichev, city (1989 pop. 92,000), in central Ukraine, on the Hnylopyat River. It is a rail junction and the industrial and trade center of an area where sugar beets are raised. Engineering, sugar refining, tanning, and the manufacture of foodstuffs are the major industries. Founded in the 14th cent., Berdychiv passed to Lithuania in 1546 and to Poland in 1569; Russia acquired it in 1793. During the 18th cent., Berdychiv was an important Ukrainian commercial city and a center of Jewish HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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. Landmarks include a fortified Carmelite monastery (17th cent.) that is now a museum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The song in question has been attributed to Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev (1740-1810) and Robeson included it in several later concerts presenting it as a sort of Jewish parallel to the Negro spirituals.
The Learning Play of Rabbi Levi-Yitzhok, Son of Sara, of Berditchev, Dan Friedman; dir: Moshe Yassur.
For Levi Isaac of Berditchev, they were supremely worthy objects of compassion, ever-innocent defendants in their trials of adversity, whose case he was always eager to plead.
Levi Isaac of Berditchev, was reported to have said that
Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev, known as the Defender of the Jewish People.
When Rabbi Levi Yitzhak became the Rav in Berditchev, he made an agreement with the town leaders: they were not to ask him to their meetings unless they intended to discuss the introduction of a new usage or a new procedure.
RABBI Levi Yitzhak of Berditchev was looking out over the town square.
Grinberg, descendent of great Hasidic rabbis, referred to Rabbi Yitzhak Levy of Berditchev as "ha-dadaistan be-talit u-tfilin," that is, "the Dadaist in prayer-shawl and phylacteries.
Two further sources are found in a much learned and very popular book by Hasidic master Isaac Levi of Berditchev, Kedushat Levi.
In his excellent book on Rabbi Levi Yitzhaq of Berditchev (1740-1810), Samuel Dresner cites the "Kaddish of Levi Yitzhaq" which mixes vernacular Yiddish and liturgical Aramaic: [1]
Even when he greased the wagons, he would recite prayers, in the style of Reb Levi Yitzhok of Berditchev.
The "Hassidic Chant," as Robeson entitled it, is a version of the Kaddish (Memorial Prayer) attributed to the Hasidic rebbe (master), Levi Yitzhak of Berditchev (1740-1810), a piece also known as the "Din Toyre mit Got" ("The Lawsuit with God").