Berekhiah ben Natronai ha-Nakdan

Berekhiah ben Natronai ha-Nakdan

(bĕrəkī`ə bĕn nätrōnī` hä-näk`dän), fl. 12th or 13th cent., French Jewish fabulist, biblical commentator, philosopher, grammarian, and translator. His first name also appears as Berachya. He is best known for his collection of fables in rhymed prose, Mishlei Shualim (tr. by M. Hadas, Fables of a Jewish Aesop, 1967), derived from the French collection Ysopet of Marie de FranceMarie de France
, fl. 1155–90, poet. Born in France, she spent her adult life in England in aristocratic circles and wrote in Anglo-Norman. She is best known for some dozen lais; several are of Celtic origin, and some are Arthurian.
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 (c.1170), from the now lost Latin translation of AesopAesop
, legendary Greek fabulist. According to Herodotus, he was a slave who lived in Samos in the 6th cent. B.C. and eventually was freed by his master. Other accounts associate him with many wild adventures and connect him with such rulers as Solon and Croesus.
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, Romulus, and from several Middle Eastern sources. His Sefer Mazref (tr. by Sir H. Gollancz, The Ethical Treatises of Berachya, 1902) is a summary of the ethical views of SaadiaSaadia ben Joseph al-Fayumi
, 882–942, Jewish scholar, b. Egypt. He was known as Saadia Gaon. He was the head of the great Jewish Academy at Sura, Babylonia, which under his leadership became the highest seat of Jewish learning, and a vigorous opponent of the Karaites.
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 and several other GaonimGaonim
[Heb.,=excellencies], title given to the heads of the Jewish academies at Sura and Pumbedita in Babylonia immediately following the period of the Saboraim until the middle of the 11th cent.
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