Abbott, Berenice

(redirected from Berenice Abbott)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Abbott, Berenice

(bĕr'ənēs`), 1898–1991, American photographer, b. Springfield, Ohio. Abbott, who had left (1918) the Midwest for Greenwich Village, then (1921) Paris, had become a sculptor before turning to photography in 1923. She was assistant (1923–25) to Man RayRay, Man,
1890–1976, American photographer, painter, and sculptor, b. Philadelphia. Along with Marcel Duchamp, Ray was a founder of the Dada movement in New York and Paris. He is celebrated for his later surrealist paintings and photography.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and made an extraordinary series of portraits of the artistic and literary celebrities of 1920s Paris. Returning to the States in 1929, she began her great documentation of New York City; her Nightview, New York (1932) is one of the most enduring images of the city. Many of the best of the photographs were collected in Changing New York (1939). During the Depression, she worked for the Federal Art Project and did portraits for Fortune magazine. In 1958 she produced stunning photographs for a high-school physics text that some critics consider her finest work. Abbott discovered the work of Eugène AtgetAtget, Eugène
, 1857–1927, French photographer. After working as a sailor and then as an actor for many years, Atget became a photographer at the age of 42. He began at once to produce his detailed visual record of Paris and its environs, particularly St.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in 1925 and ultimately secured him international recognition. Her own work was rediscovered in the 1970s.

Bibliography

See her Photographs (1970); biography by J. Van Haaaften (2018).

Abbott, Berenice

(1898–1991) photographer; born in Springfield, Ohio. After a short time at Ohio State University (1917–18) and a few weeks at Columbia University in New York City (1918), she took up the study of drawing and sculpture in New York City (1918–21), Paris (1921–23—partially under Antoine Bourdelle), and Berlin (1923). Back in Paris she became an assistant to the photographer, Man Ray (1923–25), and then opened her own portrait studio (1926–29); one of her best-known portraits was of James Joyce. Meanwhile, she had discovered the work of Eugene Atget (1857–1927), the French photographer known for his semidocumentary studies of cityscapes and activities in Paris and its suburbs; on his death she acquired his archives and thereafter promoted his work. She went back to New York City and worked as an independent documentary and portrait photographer (1929–68); she occasionally did commissions for Fortune and other magazines, but became best known for the series she did for the Federal Art Project (under the Works Progress Administration), a thorough and sensitive documentation of Manhattan during the 1930s, published as Changing New York (1939). In 1940 she turned to a new subject, capturing in photographs such scientific phenomena as magnetism, gravity, and motion; some of her work was used to illustrate high school physics texts. She also taught photography at the New School for Social Research (1935–68). Her final major projects included photographing a series on rural California and U.S. Route 1 from Maine to Florida. In 1968 she moved up to Maine where she worked until near her death.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Olivia Laing puts it in her review for The New Statesman, "this is a manifesto for a risky, radical kind of life." Or framed differently, the photographer Berenice Abbott, a woman who also understood the cost of living, once said, "Until you do what you what you want to do you do not know your own identity." Levy would agree.
Berenice Abbott (1898-1991) survived the influenza of her youth, her lower class origins, her indiscretions, and tumultuous childhood.
Summary: In 1920s Paris, Berenice Abbott was one of the world's important portrait photographers
More pertinent to the exhibition's thesis was a small subsection that looked at Evans's friendship with the photographer Berenice Abbott and the critic and arts patron Lincoln Kirstein--two key interlocutors who were important to his conception of documentary and his reception of the French photographer Eugene Atget and the American photographer Mathew Brady.
The final section includes works that relate to Benton's "America Today." Highlights are other works by Benton; renowned photographs by Walker Evans, Berenice Abbott, and Lewis Hine; and, of particular interest, Jackson Pollock's "Pasiphae" (1943).
Assad also credits photographs of the Machine Age and of industrial buildings by Berenice Abbott and Hilla Becher as influencing her vision of the tension between technological advancement and society.
There were also fully clothed masculine subjects, even though several were actually women portrayed by Romaine Brooks, Berenice Abbott, and Annie Leibowtiz.
In the case of Atget, rescued from oblivion by Szarkowski via thousands of photographic plates held privately by the American photographer, Berenice Abbott, his sense of isolation and privacy, linked to his poverty made him a figure of mystery about whom so little is known today.
It is not that all the artists were gay, but rather that they shared the exploration of gay identity by artists who were, but in variously open ways: Charles Demuth with celebrations of sailors that were not at all like his precisionist cityscapes, Marsden Hartley with his coded abstract tribute to his lover Karl von Freyburg in Berlin, Berenice Abbott photographing legendary figures such as Djuna Barnes and Janet Flanner in Paris in the 1920s, Paul Cadmus' flamboyant eroticism during and after World War II, the full visibility of photographers Robert Mapplethorpe and Nan Goldin.
BERENICE ABBOTT, 93, photographer and inventor of photographic processes, was pivotal in the American realist photographic movement.
Berenice Abbott, she photographed during the Depression period a lot of Lower Manhattan.