Bergius process


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Bergius process

[′ber·gē·əs ′präs·əs]
(chemical engineering)
Treatment of carbonaceous matter, such as coal or cellulosic materials, with hydrogen at elevated pressures and temperatures in the presence of a catalyst, to form an oil similar to crude petroleum. Also known as coal hydrogenation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bergius process for direct conversion of coal to liquids was patented in 1913/1919 [3].
The bulk of pollutants created from direct liquefaction, the Bergius process, are created in the making of hydrogen for the process, but the creation of these pollutants can be largely avoided by separating the hydrogen with heat from a new generation of super-safe nuclear reactors.
Since the helium is not made radioactive by the neutron flux in the reactor, it can be sent directly though a turbine generator to produce electricity or, in this case, used to provide ample heat for the Bergius process.
Farbenindustrie, AG (formed in 1925 with BASF as a leading member), to develop the Bergius process for industrial application.
The Nazi policy of continuing, and eventually increasing, tariffs on imported petroleum products made materials produced by the Bergius process profitable.
Originally developed around the Bergius process (concentrated hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of biomass), the CASE process achieves the highest yields in the industry, and produces high purity fractions of sugars and lignin.