Bergmann's rule


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Related to Bergmann's rule: Gloger's rule

Bergmann's rule

[′bərg·mənz ‚rül]
(ecology)
The principle that in a polytypic wide-ranging species of warm-blooded animals the average body size of members of each geographic race varies with the mean environmental temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014: Bergmann's rule for Neomys fodiens in the middle of the distribution range.
Bergmann's Rule generally holds true for whitetail deer.
The positive association between the SAB and PL and increasing elevation is in accordance with Bergmann's rule (1847), that species and populations are larger in colder geographic areas.
While Bergmann's Rule explains how animals deal with issues of heat loss and heat regulation in the cold, there may be other reasons to pack more pounds in colder climates.
This is a chance to explain the intraspecific empirical generalization called Bergmann's rule (and its few exceptions): races of warm-blooded species from cooler climates tend to be larger than races of the same species from warmer climates (Ashton et al.
Geographic gradients in body size: a clarification of Bergmann's rule.
Although Bergmann's rule was originally proposed for homeotherms, Bergmannian (and converse Bergmannian) clines occur in invertebrate and vertebrate ectotherms (Ray 1960; Masaki 1967, 1978; Honek 1993; Atkinson 1994; Mousseau 1997; Arnett & Gotelli 1999; Brisola Marcondes et al.
There is a second line of evidence that refutes the applicability of Bergmann's Rule to ectotherms, that also points to the developmental mechanism underlying geographic variation in body size.
In any case, Bergmann's rule could not explain the occurrence of RBS in the acidic habitat of the LCW.
Bergmann's Rule assumes an increase in body size with increasing latitudes/altitudes and was originally defined for endotherms, though later observed in many vertebrate and invertebrate ectotherms (Blackburn et al.
Bergmann's Rule states that animals in the northern reaches of their range will be larger than those in the south; a survival adaptation to conserve heat and store energy.