Bergson


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Bergson

Henri Louis . 1859--1941, French philosopher, who sought to bridge the gap between metaphysics and science. His main works are Memory and Matter(1896, trans. 1911) and Creative Evolution(1907, trans. 1911): Nobel prize for literature 1927
References in periodicals archive ?
Stated in more dynamic terms, just as Bergson transfigured orthodox Darwinism, so Lewis transfigured Bergson's creative evolution.
The theater management recognized the Bergson Group as the "lessee of the theatre" for the duration of the run, making the ticket agents employees of the Bergsonites and subject to whatever seating policy they chose.
2) In a frequently cited passage from Matter and Memory, Bergson writes: "To call up the past in the form of an image, we must be able to withdraw ourselves from the action of the moment, we must have the power to value the useless, we must have the will to dream" (83).
A happy Kieren Fallon, alongside solicitor Warren Bergson, as they leave Ely magistrates court yesterday
Laughter, Bergson writes, "does not belong to the province of esthetics alone, since unconsciously (and even immorally in many particular instances) it pursues a utilitarian aim of general improvement.
Bergson actually wrote out a mathematical welfare function: W = F([U.
The antinomy, in the novel, between (a) the "pure mechanical repetition" of "tick-tack time" which Gerald here incarnates and (b) the "creative mystery" whose "pulse" beats ceaselessly in Birkin can be further explicated by reference to the formulations of Henri Bergson in Creative Evolution, published in French in 1907 (Lawrence 1987,228,464,479).
After all, the "stream" began with William James and Henri Bergson as a simple image representing a flowing sequence of mental states, a visibly moving surface.
In the first part of A Question of Balance, Greer discusses Seeger's construction of a philosophy of music informed by his exposure to the thought of Henri Bergson and his reading of Bertrand Russell's "Mysticism and Logic" (1914) and Ralph Barton Perry's General Theory of Value (1926).
Discouraged by the skepticism of the prevailing intellectual culture, they first found hope in the lectures of Henri Bergson.
For the latter notion he cites Hippolyte Taine, and on memory he draws inspiration and ideas from the work of Francis Yates and Pierre Nora as well as Henri Bergson.
8) Thus, Bergson and Heidegger, whose radical reformulations of ontological questions have been among the most influential in the twentieth century, might be said to have begun with a "perspectivalist" reading or interpretation of Cartesian thought.