Newport to Bermuda Race

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Newport to Bermuda Race

June in even-numbered years
One of the oldest sailing races in the international calendar, the race from Newport, Rhode Island, to Bermuda was initiated by Thomas Fleming Day, editor and founder of Rudder magazine. At the time, most existing ocean races were for yachts of more than 100 feet, and Day wanted to see a race for smaller yachts (less than 40 feet overall). The first such race, in 1904, was run from Brooklyn, New York, to Marblehead, Massachusetts, a distance of 330 nautical miles. The following year it went from Brooklyn to Hampton Roads, Virginia (250 miles). In 1906, the finish was in Bermuda.
The Bermuda races died out in 1910, but they were revived in 1923 under the sponsorship of the Cruising Club of America (CCA). Since 1924 the race has been sailed biennially in June. The starting point was moved from New London, Connecticut, to Montauk, Long Island. But now the race is run from Narragansett Bay off Newport to St. David's Head, Bermuda—a distance of 635 nautical miles. Sponsored jointly by the CCA and the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, the Newport to Bermuda Race is now part of the Onion Patch trophy series, which consists of this and three local, unnamed races.
CONTACTS:
Bermuda Race Organizing Committee
580 Thames St., Ste. 418
Newport, RI 02840
772-584-1055; fax: 401-537-9155
www.bermudarace.com
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorade took second place in the Newport Bermuda and Transatlantic races in 1930, then won the 1931 Transatlantic Race (from Rhode Island to Plymouth); the 1931 Fastnet Race in the UK; double line honours and overall win in the 1932 Newport Bermuda Race; and also won the tough 1933 Fastnet Race.
An adventurous spirit, he was a certified scuba diver, loved to fly with his Dad, and was a competitive open ocean sailor, completing the Newport, RI to Bermuda Race several times.
Famous ocean races such as the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, the Rolex Fastnet Race and the Newport Bermuda Race are unlikely to allow multihull yachts on foils anytime soon.
A day before the June 17 start, 184, boats were entered in the Newport Bermuda Race, which runs almost entirely out of sight of land out into the Atlantic Ocean.
At Charleston Race Week, we finished first in our class, but retired from the Newport to Bermuda Race after suffering severe damage to our upper mast.
Abroad we preview the Giraglia Rolex Cup in the Med and the famous Newport to Bermuda race down the US east coast--both bucket list events for any bluewater racing enthusiast.
With 197 boats entered as of May 17, only several weeks before the start, the 50th Newport Bermuda Race may well be the third largest "Thrash to the Onion Patch" across the rough waters of the Gulf Stream since the race was founded in 1906.
Caption: CENTRE STAGE Opposite page, from top: The start of the Newport Bermuda Race; Comanche aims to break the race record this year set by Rambler in 2012.
Almost every yachting historian will agree that three events rank as the most prestigious on the ocean racing calendar: the Bermuda Race in the United States, the Fastnet Race in England and Australia's Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race.
The Sydney to Hobart yacht race was destined to become a high profile annual event on the Australian sporting calendar, and it would soon be recognised as one of the world's three classic ocean races: the others being the Newport Bermuda race out of America, and the Fastnet race out of England.
She was originally and aptly christened Speedboat--for good reason--and took line honours in her maiden outing, the Newport Bermuda Race. Bell took line honours from Wild Oats Xl in the 2011 Rolex Sydney Hobart with his former Elliott-designed super maxi (flow called Ragamuffin 100 and in the hands of Syd Fischer), crossing the finish line just three minutes and eight seconds ahead of her adversary and after surviving a protest by the Race Committee.