Bernard Mandeville

(redirected from Bernard De Mandeville)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mandeville, Bernard

 

Born in 1670, in Dordrecht, Hol-land; died Jan. 21, 1733, in London. English author.

Of French descent, Mandeville received a medical education in Leiden. In 1705 he published the satire The Grumbling Hive, or Knaves Turn ‘d Honest. This was reprinted in 1714 and 1723 under the title The Fable of the Bees, or Private Vices, Publick Benefits (Russian translation, 1924). The life of a beehive was an allegory for bourgeois society, with its competition, corruption, and social oppression. Mandeville “shows that in modern society vices are necessary and useful. This was scarcely an apology for modern society” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 2, p. 146). Mandeville led the way in English social thought toward a sober and ironic critique of the bourgeois social structure.

WORKS

Mandeville’s Travels. London, 1968.
The Fable of the Bees. London, 1970.
In Russian translation:
Deborin, A. Kniga dlia chteniia po istorii filosofii, vol. 1. Moscow. 1924.

REFERENCES

Istoriia angliiskoi literatury, vol. 1, book 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1945. Pages 296-301.
Kaye, F. B. “The Influence of Bernard Mandeville.” Studies in the Literature of the Augustan Age. New York, 1966.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bernard de Mandeville (1670- 1733), philosopher, political economist and satirist, who became infamous for his publication, The Fable of the Bees, maintained that the economy flourishes if people desire as much as possible.
One of the earliest and most influential efforts to reconsider vice was made in 1705 not by a Scot but by a Dutchman named Bernard de Mandeville.
Recovering the Medical and Scientific Content of Bernard de Mandeville. Oxford: Peter Lang.
Bernard de Mandeville, (1670-1733), philosopher, political economist and satirist, who became infamous for his publication The Fable of the Bees, maintained that the economy flourishes if people desire as much as possible.
To be sure, historical figures dot these pages: Karl Marx, Adam Smith, Johann Sussmilch, Bernard de Mandeville, Friedrich List, David Hume, Joseph Schumpeter, even Polybius.
Beginning with the mid-sixteenth-century consumer society of London, he takes us through the world and ideas of Lord Burghley, the Prodigy Houses, Nicholas Barbon and Bernard de Mandeville; he focuses on what he considers to be the vastly underestimated influence of The Spectator flowing from the pens of Pope, Addison and Hume.
For instance, rather than serving as a convincing defense of free markets, Bernard de Mandeville's The Fable of the Bees instead "demonstrates the vileness of the human species by arguing that society like a hive of bees thrives on a system of mutual rapacity and exploitation." Adam Smith's invisible hand becomes "the hidden hand of God" which transforms self-interest into the general good.
Bernard de Mandeville's Treatise of Hypochondriack and Hysteric Passions is quoted on p.
Scribano, "La Presenza di Bayle nell'opera di Bernard de Mandeville," Giornale critico della filosofia italiana (May-Aug.