Berossus


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Berossus

(bərŏ`səs), 3d cent. B.C., Babylonian priest-historian; contemporary of ManethoManetho
, fl. 300 B.C., Egyptian historian, a priest at Heliopolis, under Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II. His work, covering the history of Egypt from legendary times to 323 B.C.
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. His work, in Greek, preserved Mesopotamian myths regarding creation and history. It survives in fragments quoted by Josephus and Eusebius of Caesarea.
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180-82), combined with Berossus and Graeco-Babyloniaca tablets (containing both cuneiform writing and Greek transliterations), as examples of direct transmission of Babylonian learning to the Greek world, and by analogy and inference, to Jewish scholarship.
Kvanvig demonstrates the interaction of traditions from the most ancient pre-Atrahasis Babylonian manuscript traditions down to the relatively late historian, Berossus.
Berossus andManetho, Introduced and Translated: Native Traditions in Ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt.
Berossus, a Babylonian astronomer-priest in the 4th century BC, attributed the skyscraping arboretum to Nebuchadnezzar II, Babylon's king from 604 to 562 BC.
Arnold draws on current Assyriological data to trace the geopolitical realities behind literary references to Babylonians by ancient classical historians such as Herodotus and Berossus and by authors of the Bible.
En los excerpta de Berossus es llamado Xisuthros, Sisuthros, Sisithros y Selsithros, todos variables del original Zisuthros, el correspondiente Ziusudra sumerio.
En los excerpta de Berossus es llamado Xisuthros, Sisuthros, Sisithros y Seisithros, todos variables del original Zisuthros, el correspondiente Ziusudra sumerio.
Gilgamesh then circulated around the Near East-including into the Hittite Empire in Asia Minor-and the story was retold in Greek in the fourth century by the Babylonian historian Berossus.
But on the other hand Berossus and Manetho, who seemed to help in part by opposing the Greek view and supporting the antiquity of oriental civilizations, also created serious problems.
When I published The Babyloniaca of Berossus in 1978, it was the first English translation in over a century and the first comprehensive study of Berossos since the publication of Paul Schnabel's Berossos und die Babylonisch-Hellenistische Literatur in 1923.
There is also literary evidence: The Babylonian priest Berossus, writing in Greek in the Hellenistic period, recorded that the Achaemenid king Artaxerxes II introduced statues of the goddess Anahita to the sanctuaries of several major cities throughout the Empire.
For example, the tradition preserved by Berossus (FGH 680 F 7d) of the marriage of Amytis, daughter of Astyages, to Nebuchadnezzar is not mentioned.