Bertrada

Bertrada

(bĕrträ`də), d. 783, Frankish queen, wife of Pepin the ShortPepin the Short
(Pepin III), c.714–768, first Carolingian king of the Franks (751–68), son of Charles Martel and father of Charlemagne. Succeeding his father as mayor of the palace (741), he ruled Neustria, Burgundy, and Provence, while his brother Carloman (d.
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 and mother of CharlemagneCharlemagne
(Charles the Great or Charles I) [O.Fr.,=Charles the great], 742?–814, emperor of the West (800–814), Carolingian king of the Franks (768–814).
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. She tried without success to reconcile Charlemagne and his brother CarlomanCarloman,
751–71, son of Pepin the Short. He and his brother, Charlemagne, shared the succession to their father's kingdom; Carloman ruled the southern portion. Attempts to end rivalry between the brothers failed, and when Carloman died Charlemagne seized his domain.
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. Also called Bertha of the Big Foot or Queen Goosefoot, she figures in Carolingian legend.
References in periodicals archive ?
A major victory for Bertradas critics came in December 1104, when Galo, newly appointed as Bishop of Paris (and previously Ivo's successor as dean of Saint-Quentin, Beauvais), forced both Bertrada and Philip to abjure sexual relations and only communicate with each other in the company of trusted witnesses.
Bertrada s criticism of ecclesiastical authority also deserves to be compared to that of Peter Abelard, who provides a detailed, if partisan account of intellectual debate in this period his Historia calamitatum, written around 1132.
Bertrada de Montfort, Fulk IV of Anjou, and Philip I of France
The family of Bertrada de Montfort came from a part of Normandy close to both Blois and the royal domain of France.
He also put aside his first wife, Bertha, who had given him a son and successor, the future Louis VI, and from 1092 he lived with Bertrada de Montfort, wife of Count Fulk of Anjou.
His critics said that Philip was so besotted with Bertrada that he could not be bothered to attend to affairs of state.
Paul Hanagan is on the sidelines with flu but Moriarty proved an able deputy aboard Richard Fahey's filly, who stretched clear inside the final furlong to cosily repel Bertrada at odds of 12-1.
Frankish and Italian sources alike skirt around the reasons for this marriage, but it seems that Bertrada wanted to end the uncertain political situation in Frankia, which had arisen after the death of her husband Pippin in 768.
Stable's newly appointed apprentice Frankie Pickard is more than capable, and the 7lb claim, plus the filly's headgear, should enable Bertrada to reverse recent Southwell form with Ballyshane Spirit.
However, it may be worth noting she was hard at work approaching the final furlong and the runner-up Bertrada (matched at an in-running low of 3) was asked to make up ground from the rear, so the winner could be flattered by the result.
Bertrada showed bits of promise as a two-year-old last year but hinted at a lot better to come when she ran a sound race at Wolverhampton last month.