Besant


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Besant

Annie, née Wood. 1847--1933, British theosophist, writer, and political reformer in England and India

bezant, besant, byzant

bezant
An ornament shaped like a coin or disk; sometimes used in a series in decorative molding designs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The shock strike in July 1888 was triggered by the dismissal of a worker who refused to denounce Besant's account as lies, other girls as young as 13 walking out in solidarity and demanding better conditions.
"Many industries now use self-employed contractors, many of whom work through companies of which they are the sole directors, and this ruling would affect them if they were ever subject to such a dismissal," Mr Besant said.
After the death of Olcott in 1907 Annie Besant (1847-1933) became president of the Theosophical Society.
For Walter Besant the following questions were deeply urgent.
While Cameron's photography and Ritchie's writings exemplify concrete artistic manifestations of "creative negativity," Annie Wood Besant seems herself to have lived MacKay's concept.
Organized chronologically but grounded by the stories of the leaders mentioned above, the book is divided into two sections, the former focusing on male leadership and the traditions of masculinity and femininity in late Victorian England, and the latter considering changes under the leadership of Annie Besant and the impact of the First World War.
Cat and pleasant Besant; FLING: Vicky revealed all last week
These characters represent various modes of confrontation with India: "Forster in his Indian costume or Naipaul with his Indian heritage attempted an Indian-Western fusion at the personal level of their own identity; Curzon and Besant attempted such a fusion politically through changing social institutions....
The novel opens upon a seance held near the White Horse at Uffington in England in which the famous spiritualist Annie Besant and Anne Ashton's father try to conjure up the spirit of his dead wife.
It was written as a rebuttal to "Fiction as One of the Fine Arts," a lecture given by Sir Walter Besant in 1884, and is a manifesto of literary realism that decries the popular demand for novels that are saturated with sentimentality or pessimism.
Among Madame Blavatsky's chief followers were Annie Besant, president of the Society from 1907 to 1933, and William Butler Yeats.
Besant separated from her clergyman husband and became associated with Charles Bradlaugh in the free - thought movement.