Diphda

(redirected from Beta Ceti)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Diphda

(dif -dă) See Cetus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A system that's telescopically faint now will then shine at perhaps 2nd magnitude --as obvious to the naked eye as Beta Ceti appears now, over there to the right of it.
If you imagine a line in Pegasus from Alpheratz to Algenib, and then extend that line southward, you get to the magnitude 2.0 Diphda, Beta Ceti, the brightest star in the constellation Cetus, the whale.
Almost due south of Beta Ceti is an important coordinate point: the south galactic pole.
Extend its east side southward and you locate Beta Ceti. A diagonal line drawn northeastward across the square arrives at neighboring Andromeda, the Princess.
In 1923, a report surfaced that Beta Ceti had undergone a surge in brightness--an event newsworthy enough to make it into Time magazine (March 10, 1923).
Beta Ceti is often called Deneb Kaitos, which means "tail of the whale" (that is, of Cetus, the Whale).
It's magnitude 2.5, a little dimmer than 2.0-magnitude Beta Ceti (Diphda, or Deneb Kaitos) in the tail of the Whale far southwest.
Notice that [delta] Scl lies about two-fifths of the way from the bright star Fomalhaut to Beta Ceti and a little below the line between them.
Extend the same side of the Square far south and you pass near 2nd-magnitude Beta Ceti (Diphda or Deneb Kaitos).
These are Menkar (Alpha Ceti), Diphda (Beta Ceti), and - for a mere week or two in those rare years when it reaches its brightest maxima - the long-period variable star Mira (Omicron Ceti).
Stop to admire the giant triangle formed low in the southeast by Saturn at its apex and Fomalhaut and Beta Ceti (Diphda) making the nearly horizontal base.