Beta Radiation


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Beta Radiation

 

the flow of electrons or positrons (beta particles) that are emitted during the beta decay of radioactive isotopes.

Effect on the organism. Beta radiation leads to the development of all the signs of radiation poisoning, even to the destruction of cells, tissues, or the entire organism. The effect of beta radiation is similar to the biological effect of ionizing radiations of other types. External irradiation of an organism by beta radiation affects only the surface tissues, since the penetrating power of beta particles does not exceed several millimeters. When 45Ca, 99Sr, and other beta-radioactive isotopes enter the organism, the nature of the radiation damage depends both on their distribution in the organs and tissues and on their half-life. The relative biological effectiveness of beta radiation is close to 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 1 shows the experimental setup for measuring beta radiation, which consisted of a photomultiplier (PMT, R1924, Hamamatsu), preamplifier (Canberra amplifier model 2006), multichannel analyzer (MCA, Canberra Multiport II), and a laptop computer that was powered by a high-voltage power supplier (Canberra model 3102D).
The association of this therapy with local surgical excision of the lesions may also be a promising alternative to surgery alone and may approximate the excellent control rates reported after simple surgical excision followed by 30Gy beta radiation from a [sup.90]strontium in human superficial conjunctival SCC (KEARSLEY et al., 1988).
All HIV-uninfected patients were treated with adjunctive beta radiation, and none experienced recurrences during the study period.
Again, caesium-137 decays via beta emission into a radioactive isotope barium-137m with primary beta radiation of 190 keV.
Beta radiation from iodine-131 damages the surrounding cells and
Their response in indicating biological doses over the range 1 rad to 1,000 rad to gamma, x-ray, and beta radiation is relatively independent of quantum energy from about 0.03 MeV to 18 MeV, adequate for almost any routine or emergency monitoring of radiation.
The tape is between a beta radiation source and a detector tracking its decay and so, by tracking how much the build-up of particulate on the tape reduces the readings, the [PM.sub.10] figure can be assessed.
But Thompson's monitoring equipment also indicated that beta radiation represented about 90% of the radiation to which TMI's neighbors were exposed in April 1979, which means an enormous part of the disaster's public health risk may have been wiped from the record.
For example, in beta radiation an excess neutron turns into a proton and spews out an electron--a beta particle--and an antineutrino.
However, beta radiation is more adaptable to changing processes.
NDC got into beta gauges in '93 with the first low-energy source of beta radiation on the market (200 millicuries of radiation vs.
Gamma and beta radiation created by neutron capture in the vicinity of the beam will cause backgrounds in the electron and proton detectors.