betaine

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betaine

[′bēd·ə‚ēn]
(organic chemistry)
C5H11O2N An alkaloid; very soluble in water, soluble in ethyl alcohol and methanol; the hydrochloride is used as a source of hydrogen chloride and in medicine. Also known as lycine; oxyneurine.
References in periodicals archive ?
and/or synthesize organic compatible solutes such as proline, betaine, polyols, and soluble sugars.
This unique cocktail of surfactants, complemented by Glucotain Care, creates a body cleanser that looks and feels just like market leading oil- or sulfate-containing cleansers without needing sulfates, betaines, oils or any added conditioners.
1989) that results in an inability to convert choline to betaine aldehyde, the first committed step in the synthesis of GB (Lerma et al.
Verma argues for drought and salinity tolerance with osmolytes such as proline and various betaines (to my mind, a very dubious direction).
At reduced use levels, this DEA-free, multifunctional nonionic surfactant provides superior viscosity building performance and comparable foam stabilization to traditional amides and betaines.
good foam; but common surfactants such alkyl carboxylates, alkyl isethionates, alkyl ether sulfates and alkyl betaines, interact with the proteins and lipids found in the SC--which is evident in the common "tightening" sensation that consumers feel after washing.
Cycloteric[R]--Alkyl dimethyl betaines, Alkyl amido betaines, Alkyl amino propionates, Amphoacetates
Lubrizol has invested in a state-of-the-art multi-purpose reactor in Brazil to produce a wide range of secondary surfactants and blends including Chembetaine betaines, Amidex amides and Chemoxide amine oxides, according to Kaltenbach.
For example, betaines are excellent secondary surfactants most often used in combination with SLES; they help to enhance the performance and foam aesthetics and reduce the irritancy of the primary sulfate-based component.
Amphoterics and betaines burst on to the scene and it was noticed that the foam quality changed a bit, but the biggest change was the toxicology--the formulas became milder.
Aristonate[R] oil-soluble sulfonates, Aristonic[R] Acids, Calamide[R] amides, CalBiend[R] performance blends, Calfax[R] diphenyl oxide disulfonates, Calfoam[R] alcohol/ether sulfates, Calimulse[R] sulfonates and sulfates, Calsoft[R] sulfonates, Calsuds[R] detergent concentrates, Caltaine[R] betaines and Pilot[R] specialties and hydrotropes.