Bethlem Royal Hospital

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Bethlem Royal Hospital

(bĕth`ləm), the oldest institution for the care and confinement of the mentally ill in England, and one of the oldest in Europe. A priory in 1247, the building was converted to its later usage c.1400. The hospital moved in 1675, in 1815, and to its present location near Croydon in 1930. The word bedlam, which is derived from the hospital's name, has long been applied to any place or scene of wild turmoil and confusion. Presently, Bethlem Royal Hospital is connected with the Univ. of London's Institute of Psychiatry, and is part of the Maudsley Hospital.
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She had possibly been held in Bedlam (Bethlem Hospital) in London.
She specialised in medical law encompassing clinical negligence, crime, regulatory work and inquiries and acted in a number of notable cases including Sidaway v Board of Governors of the Bethlem Hospital, the Cleveland Child Abuse Inquiry, and Bristol Heart Surgeons Inquiry at the General Medical Council.
Royal Bethlem Hospital, on a wing for the criminally insane as a broken
In England the first of these that we know of was Bethlem hospital (Bedlam).
But the well-heeled didn't end up in the Bethlem Hospital, and places like it.
In 1791, crippled by mental illness, the mixed-up former marine was admitted to Bethlem Hospital, better known by its notorious nickname Bedlam, and died there on February 8, 1792 at the age of 69.
In the Middle Ages patients at London's Bethlem Hospital deemed insane wore armbands marking them as Bedlam Beggars.
The gallery of cats herein, by Louis Wain (1860-1939), a patient at the Bethlem Hospital for almost two decades, is to be found in the Bethlem Royal Hospital Archives and Museum, Beckenham, Kent, UK.
Morris, the Physician Superintendent of the Royal Bethlem Hospital, better known as Bedlam Asylum.
Often they were held at 'His (and later Her) Majesty's pleasure' at the Royal Bethlem Hospital, popularly known as Bedlam, and later at Broad moor when it opened in 1863.
He then spent the rest of his life in confinement, first in the Royal Bethlem Hospital and later as one of the first residents of Broadmoor when it opened in 1864.