Beton brut

Beton brut

Concrete textured by leaving the impression of the form in which it was molded, as when wood is used to create a grained effect on the surface.

béton brut

Concrete as it appears when the framework is removed, so that the concrete surface reflects the framework joints, wood grain, and fasteners around which it was poured; often deliberately retained for architectural effect. See Brutalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The term was derived from French words 'beton brut' which literally translates to raw concrete.
The name is attributed to Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier who specified beton brut (concrete that is raw or unfinished) in his designs.
The neighborhood is home to three excellent techno institutions Beton Brut, Faust and Volnost all three of which have either moved locations recently or undergone significant renovations, which perhaps speaks to the health of the techno scene and the growing popularity of this kind of music in Seoul.
The term brutalism originates from the French description of raw concrete - beton brut - and it was British architectural critic Reyner Banham who first adapted the term into "brutalism" to identify the style.
There is a sense of ambiguous monumentality to Brutalist architecture--for example, structures such as Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation (Housing Unit), known as "the radiant city," completed in Marseilles in 1952 and described by the architect as "the first manifestation of an environment suited to modern life." This three-dimensional beton brut (rough-cast concrete) grid comprises 337 apartments designed to house some sixteen hundred residents alongside shopping areas, a hotel, and a rooftop terrace.
Avec ses murs en beton brut et ses 6 metres de hauteur sous plafond, ses expositions melant accrochages traditionnels et wallpaintings sont devenues des rendez-vous incontournables de la scene artistique parisienne.
Brutalism, an architectural spin-off of modernism that gets its moniker from the French "beton brut" meaning "raw concrete," remains as divisive a style today as during its heyday a half century ago.
Perhaps the most tangible is La Tourette (AR June 1961), Corb's vision of French Dominican monastic life as a beton brut megastructure triumphantly grafted on to a hillside.
Often described as brutalist (which comes from French for raw concrete 'beton brut'), these high rise buildings are now seen by many as a blot on the landscape.
There it is in designer Tal Itzhaki's contribution to this issue's special coverage of the theatrical response here and abroad to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: In "Beyond Concrete" (page 34), her fascinating meditation on the ubiquitous beton brut that pervades Israeli architecture and forms the substance of the wall being built to separate the two embattled cultures, Itzhaki writes: "The separation wall has become a monstrous visual entity we shun to see, a reality we do not want to witness.
Imprints of bamboo planks may prompt memories of beton brut, yet can also be interpreted as the fossil remains of bamboo groves.
Exposed concrete (beton brut) is hardly a new or uncommon devised material within the context of Israeli life and culture--it is an all-too-familiar element in the spheres of Israeli architecture and public sculpture.