Siamese fighting fish

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Siamese fighting fish:

see bettabetta
or fighting fish,
small, freshwater fish of the genus Betta, found in Thailand and the Malay Peninsula. Best known is the Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Mature males of this species are about 2 in. (5 cm) long. In its native waters B.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Siamese Fighting Fish

 

(Betta splendens), a fish of the family Anabantidae of the suborder Anabantoidea (labyrinthic fishes). The fish is up to 8 cm long. The males, especially during the mating season, are brightly colored. Siamese fighting fish are found in the fresh waters of Southeast Asia (India, Thailand, and the Malay Peninsula). The male builds a nest out of air bubbles (foam) on the surface of the water; the female deposits the eggs on the bottom of the body of water, and then the male carries them in his mouth into the nest, where he guards them and subsequently the fry. The Siamese fighting fish easily reproduces in small aquariums (at temperatures of 25° to 30° C). Veiled and variegated forms of the fish are bred in aquariums; these forms include the red, cornflower blue, rose, blue, and green fish.

REFERENCE

Il’in, M. N. Akvariumnoe rybovodstvo. Moscow, 1968.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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KEY WORDS: Betta splendens; oxygen; mirrors; aggression
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