Bevan

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Bevan

Aneurin , known as Nye. 1897--1960, British Labour statesman, born in Wales: noted for his oratory. As minister of health (1945--51) he introduced the National Health Service (1948)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilson's apparently seamless transition from Bevanite to Gaitskellite and eventually party leader upon's Gaitskell's death underlined his reputation for slippery political expediency.
The Bevanite view prevailed and the NHS was established as a national service.
Apart from a brief stint as a Bevanite inside the Labour Party in the 1950s, he was never a member of a political party, but found his closest allies among those who left the Communist Parties after 1956 and remained committed to the struggle for socialist democracy.
This has also been true of most left, radical and socialist or social democratic traditions through Labour's history--from New Left to post-left, Bevanite and Bennite to Blairite, and 'Blue' to 'One Nation Labour'.
For a long time we probably assumed we were on the crest of a Bevanite wave that would never crash.
But, of course, when Attlee left (1955; to accept an earldom, replaced by Hugh Gaitskell), the party divided with the Bevanite wing and the Tribune group in which Michael Foot was a major figure.''
``May I, as a Bevanite who aspires to be a Blairite, tell my right honourable friend that there are those of us who would rather undergo root canal surgery without anaesthetic...
This reading of consensus can happily accommodate the presence of the Bevanite left in 1951 and their heirs in 1968--70 or the Suez group in the Conservative Party in 1954--56.
The personal story concerns my father, a Bevanite to the day he died.
Keohane underlines the conflict in Labour Party defence policies since the war between what might be called Bevinite considerations of patriotism (reinforced by the need to seem electable) and Lansburyesque and Bevanite considerations of pacifist and welfare ideology.
To strengthen his case he pointed out that the left had been particularly critical of the block vote system at the height of the Bevanite rebellion.