Beza


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Beza

, de Bèze
Théodore .1519--1605, French Calvinist theologian and scholar, who lived in Switzerland. He succeeded Calvin as leader of the Swiss Protestants
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Chede explained that 'Beza'' means mother of Fulani women in Zamfara.
Dexamethasone treatment resulted in a reduced final body mass (-15%) in the Dexa group compared with that in the Ctl group (Figure 2(c)) (n = 8-10, p < 0.05), but the 10% reduction was not significant in the BezaDexa group compared with that in the Beza group.
(48) Theodore Beza, Epistolarum theologicarum Theodori Bezae Vezelii (Geneva: Apud Eustathium Vignon, 1573), 185; Nancy G.
Summers's study of Beza is thus a welcome contribution to a developing field.
Dreadfully worried, they made the difficult uphill trek for an hour through the forest to the home of the traditional doctor and buda expert, Beza. Beza provided a snuff made from local plants, and the baby was soon better.
Concernant l'enseignement de tamazight, Beza Benmansour, SG a la direction de l'education, a assure que Bejaia ne connaissait aucune difficulte dans sa generalisation.
During the visit, the two sides agreed to cooperate in various fields and to expand the scope of the partnership in the fields of trade, investments, energy and power, defense, human resources, infrastructure and in the priority sectors in the Economic Zones under Bangladesh Economic Zone Authority (BEZA) and IT parks.
Scores of militants were killed and wounded in the army attacks on their positions in the towns of Al-Bab, Qabasin, Beza and Susian.
The editors often fail to identify the source of Latin quotations: when Evelyn writes "ut Erratorum Poenas et ungue et Obeliscis luant" (1127), he is quoting a letter by the cinquecento genius Giovanni Pico della Mirandula, as indeed the context suggests; when he writes "ubi amor, ibi oculus" (408), he is quoting a phrase from the medieval theologian Richard of St Victor, which was proverbial in the seventeenth century; when he writes "quorsum haec perditio" (946)--which means "why this waste?" and not "in what direction this ruin?"--he is misquoting Beza's translation of the Bible.
Others, such as Calvin's successor Theodore Beza, the author of the Dutch national anthem Het Wilhelmus, and Scottish Presbyterian Samuel Rutherford were confronting monarchs who savagely opposed the Reformation, and found in the stories a subversive text latent with revolutionary possibilities.
He was also "Colonel Beza", "Piet Niacud," and "Captain Fritz du Quesne", which amazingly enough was his actual name and rank.