Bhamaha

Bhamaha

 

Years of birth and death unknown. Indian scholar of the second half of the seventh century.

Bhamaha was the author of the treatise Poetic Ornamentation (in six parts), written in verse form. This work is primarily devoted to the description of various rhetorical figures (upama —simile, anuprasa—alliteration, and others) and the analysis of the excellences of poetic discourse (guna) and style (riti). Bhamaha was the most prominent representative of the so-called alamkara school of Indian poetry, which considered the rhetorical figure (alamkara) to be the heart of the poetic work.

REFERENCES

De, S. K. History of Sanskrit Poetics, 2nd ed. Calcutta, 1960.
Kane, P. V. “History of Sanskrit Poetics.” In the book Visvanatha. Sahityadarpana. Bombay, 1951.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Debemos las principales referencias a importantes teoricos literarios del periodo clasico: en el siglo VII, Bhamaha (Kavyalakara); en el VIII, Vamana (Kavyalakarasutrani); en el IX, Rajasekhara (citado por Jalhana en su antologia poetica Suktimuktavali, fechada hacia el siglo XIII), y en el X, Abhinavagupta (Abhinavabharati).
In the 6th/7th century, in Bhamaha, Vamana, we have a revised notion--the notion of samajika, a social being, a participant in a collective performance as it were.
Bhamaha opines that kavya formation is like stringing of a garland.
Bhamaha speaks that deviant expression is the natural language of poetry.
La poetica clasica india era hasta hace poco desconocida para los kumaonis; incluso hoy dia, la mayoria no conoce a Bhamaha o Anandavardhana mejor que a Quintiliano o Roland Barthes, o sea, que no los conocen en absoluto.
The former is clearly indebted to Dandin, Bhamaha, and other pre-dhvani poeticians, who classified rasavat as a poetic figure (McCrea 2008: 42-52).
8) But as I hope to demonstrate below, there is good reason to believe that Dandin's vyajastuti was conceived in response to Bhamaha's, or to what we may call the Bhamaha position even if it was first formulated by another author.
Bhamaha addresses vyajastuti in Chapter Three of his work, the second of two chapters dedicated to literary ornaments.
Thus vyajastuti, if my interpretation of Bhamaha is correct, amounts to a scathing letter of resignation, containing a truth about the boss that an employee would not normally dare to express.
One curiosity: Both places Bhamaha in the fourth or fifth century, while the references he cites (P.
Bhamaha understands the terms akhyayika and katha (Kavyalankara 1.
Far from his being the innovator of the view that some figurative meanings are furnished srutya, others, arthena, we find this same distinction made by the earliest alamkarika, Bhamaha (Kavyalamkara, 1.